File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Association of secular trends in unemployment with suicide in Taiwan, 1959-2007: A time-series analysis

TitleAssociation of secular trends in unemployment with suicide in Taiwan, 1959-2007: A time-series analysis
Authors
KeywordsSuicide
Taiwan
Time-series analysis
Unemployment
Issue Date2010
PublisherWB Saunders Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/puhe
Citation
Public Health, 2010, v. 124 n. 1, p. 49-54 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: Despite the wealth of research investigating the association of unemployment with suicide in the West, few studies have investigated the association in non-Western countries. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between secular trends in unemployment and suicide in Taiwan. Study design: Time-series analysis. Methods: Overall and age-specific suicide rates (1959-2007) for Taiwanese men and women aged 15 years or above were calculated from national population and mortality statistics. The association of secular trends in unemployment with suicide was investigated graphically and using time-series modelling (Prais-Winsten regression). Results: Rises in unemployment were associated with an increase in male suicide rates, but evidence for an association in females was limited. In the model controlling for changes in gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, GDP growth, divorce and female labour force participation, for every 1% rise in unemployment, male suicide rates increased by 3.1 (95% confidence interval 1.4-4.8) per 100,000. There is no evidence for a difference in the strength of association between men of different ages. Conclusion: Trends in suicide, particularly for adult males, appear to be influenced by unemployment. The results have implications for suicide prevention, in particular for societies facing acute rises in unemployment during recessions. © 2009 The Royal Society for Public Health.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145493
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 1.434
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.651
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Taiwanese Government
Higher Education Funding Council for England
University of Bristol
Funding Information:

The authors wish to acknowledge the support for S-S. Chang's Ph.D study from the Taiwanese Government (the Government Funds of the Ministry of Education), the Higher Education Funding Council for England (Overseas Research Scholarship) and the University of Bristol (University of Bristol Postgraduate Research Scholarship). D. Gunnell is a National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Senior Investigator.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChang, SSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSterne, JACen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHuang, WCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChuang, HLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGunnell, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-23T12:11:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-23T12:11:45Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPublic Health, 2010, v. 124 n. 1, p. 49-54en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0033-3506en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145493-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Despite the wealth of research investigating the association of unemployment with suicide in the West, few studies have investigated the association in non-Western countries. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between secular trends in unemployment and suicide in Taiwan. Study design: Time-series analysis. Methods: Overall and age-specific suicide rates (1959-2007) for Taiwanese men and women aged 15 years or above were calculated from national population and mortality statistics. The association of secular trends in unemployment with suicide was investigated graphically and using time-series modelling (Prais-Winsten regression). Results: Rises in unemployment were associated with an increase in male suicide rates, but evidence for an association in females was limited. In the model controlling for changes in gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, GDP growth, divorce and female labour force participation, for every 1% rise in unemployment, male suicide rates increased by 3.1 (95% confidence interval 1.4-4.8) per 100,000. There is no evidence for a difference in the strength of association between men of different ages. Conclusion: Trends in suicide, particularly for adult males, appear to be influenced by unemployment. The results have implications for suicide prevention, in particular for societies facing acute rises in unemployment during recessions. © 2009 The Royal Society for Public Health.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/puheen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPublic Healthen_HK
dc.subjectSuicideen_HK
dc.subjectTaiwanen_HK
dc.subjectTime-series analysisen_HK
dc.subjectUnemploymenten_HK
dc.titleAssociation of secular trends in unemployment with suicide in Taiwan, 1959-2007: A time-series analysisen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChang, SS: sschang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChang, SS=rp01582en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.puhe.2009.11.005en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20003993en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-76449102100en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-76449102100&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume124en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage49en_HK
dc.identifier.epage54en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000274284400010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChang, SS=35232386600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSterne, JAC=7006014653en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuang, WC=7407903480en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChuang, HL=7103110587en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGunnell, D=7006194937en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats