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Article: Bringing patients' own medications into an emergency department by ambulance: Effect on prescribing accuracy when these patients are admitted to hospital

TitleBringing patients' own medications into an emergency department by ambulance: Effect on prescribing accuracy when these patients are admitted to hospital
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherAustralasian Medical Publishing Company Pty Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mja.com.au
Citation
Medical Journal Of Australia, 2009, v. 191 n. 7, p. 374-377 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To determine whether the availability of patients' own medications (POM) in emergency departments (EDs) results in decreased prescribing errors of patients' usual medications on admission. Design, participants and setting: Observational study of patients presenting by ambulance to the ED of Austin Hospital, a Melbourne metropolitan teaching hospital, between 13 and 31 March 2006. Patients were enrolled if they were brought to the ED by ambulance, aged 18 years or older, taking four or more regular medications, admitted to hospital, and not referred to a pharmacist before the admission medication chart was written. ED pharmacists determined patients' regular medications and details of medications brought in by ambulance. Admission medication charts were assessed and discrepancies were recorded as prescribing errors if a change was made after a pharmacist discussed the discrepancy with the prescriber. Main outcome measures: Percentage of medications correctly prescribed when POM were brought in to the ED compared with when they were not; the nature and frequency of prescribing errors on admission. Results: 100 patients were enrolled; they were taking 4-17 regular medications (mean, 8.0; SD, 3.7). Among the 428 POM that were brought to the ED, 56 errors occurred (13.1%); and among the 372 regular medications taken by patients for whom POM were not brought in, 95 errors occurred (25.5%) (difference in percentages, 12.4%; 95% CI, 6.7%-18.0%; P < 0.001). The most prevalent prescribing errors were omissions (40.4%), and most errors (72.8%) were classified as of "moderate" clinical significance. Conclusions: When POM were brought to the ED by paramedics, significantly fewer errors occurred on admission medication charts. An intervention program to encourage paramedics to bring POM to the ED is indicated.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145481
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.369
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.029
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, EWYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, SEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMarriott, JLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBarger, Ben_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-23T12:11:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-23T12:11:07Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMedical Journal Of Australia, 2009, v. 191 n. 7, p. 374-377en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0025-729Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145481-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To determine whether the availability of patients' own medications (POM) in emergency departments (EDs) results in decreased prescribing errors of patients' usual medications on admission. Design, participants and setting: Observational study of patients presenting by ambulance to the ED of Austin Hospital, a Melbourne metropolitan teaching hospital, between 13 and 31 March 2006. Patients were enrolled if they were brought to the ED by ambulance, aged 18 years or older, taking four or more regular medications, admitted to hospital, and not referred to a pharmacist before the admission medication chart was written. ED pharmacists determined patients' regular medications and details of medications brought in by ambulance. Admission medication charts were assessed and discrepancies were recorded as prescribing errors if a change was made after a pharmacist discussed the discrepancy with the prescriber. Main outcome measures: Percentage of medications correctly prescribed when POM were brought in to the ED compared with when they were not; the nature and frequency of prescribing errors on admission. Results: 100 patients were enrolled; they were taking 4-17 regular medications (mean, 8.0; SD, 3.7). Among the 428 POM that were brought to the ED, 56 errors occurred (13.1%); and among the 372 regular medications taken by patients for whom POM were not brought in, 95 errors occurred (25.5%) (difference in percentages, 12.4%; 95% CI, 6.7%-18.0%; P < 0.001). The most prevalent prescribing errors were omissions (40.4%), and most errors (72.8%) were classified as of "moderate" clinical significance. Conclusions: When POM were brought to the ED by paramedics, significantly fewer errors occurred on admission medication charts. An intervention program to encourage paramedics to bring POM to the ED is indicated.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAustralasian Medical Publishing Company Pty Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mja.com.auen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMedical Journal of Australiaen_HK
dc.titleBringing patients' own medications into an emergency department by ambulance: Effect on prescribing accuracy when these patients are admitted to hospitalen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, EWY: ewchan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, EWY=rp01587en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid19807626-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77951212963en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77951212963&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume191en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage374en_HK
dc.identifier.epage377en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1326-5377-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000271556800006-
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, EWY=14043219000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTaylor, SE=7404757895en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMarriott, JL=7005125842en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBarger, B=35848120200en_HK

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