File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: An intervention to encourage ambulance paramedics to bring patients' own medications to the ED: Impact on medications brought in and prescribing errors

TitleAn intervention to encourage ambulance paramedics to bring patients' own medications to the ED: Impact on medications brought in and prescribing errors
Authors
KeywordsAllied health personnel
Ambulance
Drug prescriptions
Emergency medicine
Emergency services
Hospital
Medication errors
Issue Date2010
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EMA
Citation
Ema - Emergency Medicine Australasia, 2010, v. 22 n. 2, p. 151-158 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To undertake and evaluate a multifaceted intervention to encourage paramedics to bring patients' own medications (POM) to the ED. Method: Adult patients were enrolled in each of the pre-intervention (March 2006) and post-intervention (December 2006) periods if they were brought to ED by ambulance, taking four or more medications, admitted to hospital and were not referred to a pharmacist prior to the admission medication chart being written. ED pharmacists determined patients' regular medication and details of medications brought in by ambulance. Medication charts were assessed for discrepancies related to medications taken prior to presentation. These were recorded as errors if a change was made to the medication chart after discussion with the prescriber. The intervention, conducted in October and November 2006, involved meetings with Metropolitan Ambulance Service team managers and dissemination of promotional material. Paramedics of the Metropolitan Ambulance Service were participants for the intervention. Main outcome measures were: percentage of regular medications incorrectly prescribed; and percentage of POM brought to ED by paramedics. Results: One hundred patients were enrolled in each of the pre- and post-intervention periods. The percentage of regular medications incorrectly prescribed significantly decreased from 18.9% (151/800, 95% CI 16-22%) to 8.8% (73/834, 95% CI 7-11%) in the pre- and post-intervention periods, respectively (P < 0.001). Pre-intervention, paramedics brought some or all POM to ED in 67.0% (67/100, 95% CI 57-76%) of cases compared with 87.0% (87/100, 95% CI 78-93%) of cases, post-intervention. Conclusion: The multifaceted intervention encouraging paramedics to bring POM to ED was effective. POM were brought into ED more frequently and prescribing errors reduced. © 2010 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145479
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.223
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.567
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
The Society of Hospital Pharmacists of Australia
Funding Information:

The present study was supported by the DBL Research and Development Fund from The Society of Hospital Pharmacists of Australia.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, EWYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, SEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMarriott, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBarger, Ben_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-23T12:11:06Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-23T12:11:06Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEma - Emergency Medicine Australasia, 2010, v. 22 n. 2, p. 151-158en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1742-6731en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145479-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To undertake and evaluate a multifaceted intervention to encourage paramedics to bring patients' own medications (POM) to the ED. Method: Adult patients were enrolled in each of the pre-intervention (March 2006) and post-intervention (December 2006) periods if they were brought to ED by ambulance, taking four or more medications, admitted to hospital and were not referred to a pharmacist prior to the admission medication chart being written. ED pharmacists determined patients' regular medication and details of medications brought in by ambulance. Medication charts were assessed for discrepancies related to medications taken prior to presentation. These were recorded as errors if a change was made to the medication chart after discussion with the prescriber. The intervention, conducted in October and November 2006, involved meetings with Metropolitan Ambulance Service team managers and dissemination of promotional material. Paramedics of the Metropolitan Ambulance Service were participants for the intervention. Main outcome measures were: percentage of regular medications incorrectly prescribed; and percentage of POM brought to ED by paramedics. Results: One hundred patients were enrolled in each of the pre- and post-intervention periods. The percentage of regular medications incorrectly prescribed significantly decreased from 18.9% (151/800, 95% CI 16-22%) to 8.8% (73/834, 95% CI 7-11%) in the pre- and post-intervention periods, respectively (P < 0.001). Pre-intervention, paramedics brought some or all POM to ED in 67.0% (67/100, 95% CI 57-76%) of cases compared with 87.0% (87/100, 95% CI 78-93%) of cases, post-intervention. Conclusion: The multifaceted intervention encouraging paramedics to bring POM to ED was effective. POM were brought into ED more frequently and prescribing errors reduced. © 2010 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EMAen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEMA - Emergency Medicine Australasiaen_HK
dc.subjectAllied health personnelen_HK
dc.subjectAmbulanceen_HK
dc.subjectDrug prescriptionsen_HK
dc.subjectEmergency medicineen_HK
dc.subjectEmergency servicesen_HK
dc.subjectHospitalen_HK
dc.subjectMedication errorsen_HK
dc.titleAn intervention to encourage ambulance paramedics to bring patients' own medications to the ED: Impact on medications brought in and prescribing errorsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, EWY: ewchan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, EWY=rp01587en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1742-6723.2010.01273.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20534050-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77951218953en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77951218953&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume22en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage151en_HK
dc.identifier.epage158en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1742-6723-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000276860300007-
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, EWY=14043219000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTaylor, SE=7404757895en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMarriott, J=7005125842en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBarger, B=35848120200en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats