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Article: Intravenous Olanzapine for Acute Agitation in the Emergency Department

TitleIntravenous Olanzapine for Acute Agitation in the Emergency Department
Authors
KeywordsAbsence Of Side Effects
Acute Disease
Adult
Aerosol
Article
Case Report
Coffee
Drug Efficacy
Drug Safety
Emergency Ward
Female
General Practitioner
Hospital Discharge
Human
Male
Medical History
Medical Staff
Paranoia
Patient Compliance
Patient Referral
Pepper
Police
Relapse
Restlessness
Schizophrenia
Schizophreniform Disorder
Sedation
Violence
Wandering Behavior
Issue Date2011
PublisherSociety of Hospital Pharmacists of Australia. The Journal's web site is located at http://jppr.shpa.org.au/scripts/cgiip.exe/WService=SHPAJP/ccms.r
Citation
Journal Of Pharmacy Practice And Research, 2011, v. 41 n. 2, p. 135-137 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Despite the lack of supporting evidence, olanzapine intramuscular (IM) injection continues to be used via the unapproved intravenous (IV) route for the management of acute agitation in the emergency setting. Aim: To report the management of acute agitation using IV olanzapine via 4 representative cases in the emergency department (ED). Clinical details and outcome: IV olanzapine was used in 4 adult patients. Hospital security alerts were called in each case, mobilising security and ED staff. De-escalation strategies were employed and chemical restraints were administered as a last resort. IV olanzapine was used as the initial, second or last drug to chemically manage the agitation. Olanzapine was used alone or in combination with benzodiazepines and/or other antipsychotics. No adverse events were observed and vital signs remained within normal ranges. Sedation was noted from 30 minutes post olanzapine administration. There were relapses of agitation which required further sedation. No clinical trials have reported on the safety of IV olanzapine for the management of acute agitation specifically in the ED. Conclusion: There is little evidence of efficacy or safety to support the use of IV olanzapine in the ED.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145476
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.160
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, EWYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKnott, JCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, DMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKong, DCMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-23T12:11:05Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-23T12:11:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Pharmacy Practice And Research, 2011, v. 41 n. 2, p. 135-137en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1445-937Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145476-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Despite the lack of supporting evidence, olanzapine intramuscular (IM) injection continues to be used via the unapproved intravenous (IV) route for the management of acute agitation in the emergency setting. Aim: To report the management of acute agitation using IV olanzapine via 4 representative cases in the emergency department (ED). Clinical details and outcome: IV olanzapine was used in 4 adult patients. Hospital security alerts were called in each case, mobilising security and ED staff. De-escalation strategies were employed and chemical restraints were administered as a last resort. IV olanzapine was used as the initial, second or last drug to chemically manage the agitation. Olanzapine was used alone or in combination with benzodiazepines and/or other antipsychotics. No adverse events were observed and vital signs remained within normal ranges. Sedation was noted from 30 minutes post olanzapine administration. There were relapses of agitation which required further sedation. No clinical trials have reported on the safety of IV olanzapine for the management of acute agitation specifically in the ED. Conclusion: There is little evidence of efficacy or safety to support the use of IV olanzapine in the ED.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSociety of Hospital Pharmacists of Australia. The Journal's web site is located at http://jppr.shpa.org.au/scripts/cgiip.exe/WService=SHPAJP/ccms.r-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Pharmacy Practice and Researchen_HK
dc.subjectAbsence Of Side Effectsen_US
dc.subjectAcute Diseaseen_US
dc.subjectAdulten_US
dc.subjectAerosolen_US
dc.subjectArticleen_US
dc.subjectCase Reporten_US
dc.subjectCoffeeen_US
dc.subjectDrug Efficacyen_US
dc.subjectDrug Safetyen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Warden_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectGeneral Practitioneren_US
dc.subjectHospital Dischargeen_US
dc.subjectHumanen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectMedical Historyen_US
dc.subjectMedical Staffen_US
dc.subjectParanoiaen_US
dc.subjectPatient Complianceen_US
dc.subjectPatient Referralen_US
dc.subjectPepperen_US
dc.subjectPoliceen_US
dc.subjectRelapseen_US
dc.subjectRestlessnessen_US
dc.subjectSchizophreniaen_US
dc.subjectSchizophreniform Disorderen_US
dc.subjectSedationen_US
dc.subjectViolenceen_US
dc.subjectWandering Behavioren_US
dc.titleIntravenous Olanzapine for Acute Agitation in the Emergency Departmenten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, EWY: ewchan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, EWY=rp01587en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79960351624en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros218711-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79960351624&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume41en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage135en_HK
dc.identifier.epage137en_HK
dc.publisher.placeAustralia-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, EWY=14043219000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKnott, JC=7102964211en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTaylor, DM=35512837000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKong, DCM=7202350808en_HK

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