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Article: Development and validation of a surgical workload measure: The surgery task load index (SURG-TLX)

TitleDevelopment and validation of a surgical workload measure: The surgery task load index (SURG-TLX)
Authors
KeywordsMedicine & Public Health
Surgery
Abdominal Surgery
Cardiac Surgery
General Surgery
Thoracic Surgery
Vascular Surgery
Issue Date2011
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00268/
Citation
World Journal Of Surgery, 2011, v. 35 n. 9, p. 1961-1969 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The purpose of the present study was to develop and validate a multidimensional, surgery-specific workload measure (the SURG-TLX), and to determine its utility in providing diagnostic information about the impact of various sources of stress on the perceived demands of trained surgical operators. As a wide range of stressors have been identified for surgeons in the operating room, the current approach of considering stress as a unidimensional construct may not only limit the degree to which underlying mechanisms may be understood but also the degree to which training interventions may be successfully matched to particular sources of stress. Methods: The dimensions of the SURG-TLX were based on two current multidimensional workload measures and developed via focus group discussion. The six dimensions were defined as mental demands, physical demands, temporal demands, task complexity, situational stress, and distractions. Thirty novices were trained on the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) peg transfer task and then completed the task under various conditions designed to manipulate the degree and source of stress experienced: task novelty, physical fatigue, time pressure, evaluation apprehension, multitasking, and distraction. Results: The results were supportive of the discriminant sensitivity of the SURG-TLX to different sources of stress. The sub-factors loaded on the relevant stressors as hypothesized, although the evaluation pressure manipulation was not strong enough to cause a significant rise in situational stress. Conclusions: The present study provides support for the validity of the SURG-TLX instrument and also highlights the importance of considering how different stressors may load surgeons. Implications for categorizing the difficulty of certain procedures, the implementation of new technology in the operating room (man-machine interface issues), and the targeting of stress training strategies to the sources of demand are discussed. Modifications to the scale to enhance clinical utility are also suggested. © 2011 The Author(s).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145094
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.523
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.375
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Economic and Social Research Council of the United Kingdom
Research Grants Council of Hong KongRES-000-22-3016
University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This work was supported by a bilateral research grant from the Economic and Social Research Council of the United Kingdom and the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong (RES-000-22-3016), as well as by funding from the University of Hong Kong Seed Funding Programme for Basic Research.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWilson, MRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPoolton, JMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMalhotra, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNgo, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorBright, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-21T05:44:48Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-21T05:44:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationWorld Journal Of Surgery, 2011, v. 35 n. 9, p. 1961-1969en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0364-2313en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145094-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The purpose of the present study was to develop and validate a multidimensional, surgery-specific workload measure (the SURG-TLX), and to determine its utility in providing diagnostic information about the impact of various sources of stress on the perceived demands of trained surgical operators. As a wide range of stressors have been identified for surgeons in the operating room, the current approach of considering stress as a unidimensional construct may not only limit the degree to which underlying mechanisms may be understood but also the degree to which training interventions may be successfully matched to particular sources of stress. Methods: The dimensions of the SURG-TLX were based on two current multidimensional workload measures and developed via focus group discussion. The six dimensions were defined as mental demands, physical demands, temporal demands, task complexity, situational stress, and distractions. Thirty novices were trained on the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) peg transfer task and then completed the task under various conditions designed to manipulate the degree and source of stress experienced: task novelty, physical fatigue, time pressure, evaluation apprehension, multitasking, and distraction. Results: The results were supportive of the discriminant sensitivity of the SURG-TLX to different sources of stress. The sub-factors loaded on the relevant stressors as hypothesized, although the evaluation pressure manipulation was not strong enough to cause a significant rise in situational stress. Conclusions: The present study provides support for the validity of the SURG-TLX instrument and also highlights the importance of considering how different stressors may load surgeons. Implications for categorizing the difficulty of certain procedures, the implementation of new technology in the operating room (man-machine interface issues), and the targeting of stress training strategies to the sources of demand are discussed. Modifications to the scale to enhance clinical utility are also suggested. © 2011 The Author(s).en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00268/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofWorld Journal of Surgeryen_HK
dc.rightsThe Author(s)en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong Licenseen_US
dc.subjectMedicine & Public Healthen_US
dc.subjectSurgeryen_US
dc.subjectAbdominal Surgeryen_US
dc.subjectCardiac Surgeryen_US
dc.subjectGeneral Surgeryen_US
dc.subjectThoracic Surgeryen_US
dc.subjectVascular Surgeryen_US
dc.titleDevelopment and validation of a surgical workload measure: The surgery task load index (SURG-TLX)en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4551/resserv?sid=springerlink&genre=article&atitle=Development and Validation of a Surgical Workload Measure: The Surgery Task Load Index (SURG-TLX)&title=World Journal of Surgery&issn=03642313&date=2011-09-01&volume=35&issue=9& spage=1961&authors=Mark R. Wilson, Jamie M. Poolton, Neha Malhotra, <i>et al.</i>en_US
dc.identifier.emailPoolton, JM: jamiep@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMasters, RSW: mastersr@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPoolton, JM=rp00949en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, RSW=rp00935en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00268-011-1141-4en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21597890-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3152702-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052273854en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros193946-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80052273854&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume35en_HK
dc.identifier.issue9en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1961en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1969en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1432-2323en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000293705500004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 21 Feb 2012en_US
dc.relation.projectGaze strategies of laparoscopy surgeons: Observational learning, implicit knowledge and performance in demanding conditions-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilson, MR=7408663801en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoolton, JM=8921750800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMalhotra, N=36935977200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNgo, K=36935919000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBright, E=37460932200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMasters, RSW=7102880488en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9380462-

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