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Article: Predation contributes to invasion resistance of benthic communities against the non-indigenous tunicate Ciona intestinalis

TitlePredation contributes to invasion resistance of benthic communities against the non-indigenous tunicate Ciona intestinalis
Authors
KeywordsEnemy release
Fouling
Invasibility
Propagule supply
Rocky subtidal
Issue Date2011
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=1387-3547
Citation
Biological Invasions, 2011, v. 13 n. 9, p. 2023-2034 How to Cite?
AbstractMarine anthropogenic structures offer novel niches for introduced species but their role in the subsequent invasion to natural habitats remains unknown. Upon arrival in new environments, invaders must overcome biotic resistance from native competitors and predators if they are to establish successfully in natural habitats. We tested the hypotheses that (1) artificial structures (e. g., suspended aquaculture installations) present a niche opportunity for invasive species by providing a refuge from native benthic predators, and (2) native predators in natural benthic habitats suppress successful colonization by invaders. A recruitment experiment showed that the ascidians Pyura chilensis (native) and Ciona intestinalis (invasive) could recruit to both suspended artificial structures and natural benthic habitats. Ciona, however, was only able to establish adult populations on artificial structures. In natural benthic habitats Ciona only recruited and grew in predator-exclusion cages, because without this protection predation prevented its establishment. In predation experiments, native invertebrate and fish predators removed all invasive ascidians (recruits and adults) in benthic habitats, which contrasted with the high adult survival of the native ascidian P. chilensis. The refuge from a number of benthic predators facilitates the establishment of large populations of invasive species on suspended structures. We present a conceptual model of the invasion processes that includes the anthropogenic structures as a transitional stepping-stone that facilitates invasion by enhancing and prolonging propagule supply to surrounding natural communities. Those established invaders might then overcome biotic resistance during time periods when populations of consumers or competitors are weakened by natural or anthropogenic disturbances. Our results suggest that the conservation of natural habitats with a high diversity of native predators can be an effective means to prevent the spread of invasive species growing on suspended structures. © 2011 The Author(s).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145092
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.855
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.441
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
FONDECYT3070048
Funding Information:

We are grateful to J.D. Urriago, J.C. Astudillo, M. Bravo, F. Schneider and M. Thompson for their help with the experiments. Special thanks to L. G. Harris who provided useful ideas at the early stage of the study. We thank B. Broitman, J.H. Himmelman, S. A. Navarette, G. Ruiz, S. Sampson, G. Williams, B. Worm, and three anonymous reviewers and the editor J. Byers for comments on the manuscript. Financial support for this study was provided by FONDECYT 3070048 to CPD.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDumont, CPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGaymer, CFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThiel, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-21T05:43:50Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-21T05:43:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBiological Invasions, 2011, v. 13 n. 9, p. 2023-2034en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1387-3547en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145092-
dc.description.abstractMarine anthropogenic structures offer novel niches for introduced species but their role in the subsequent invasion to natural habitats remains unknown. Upon arrival in new environments, invaders must overcome biotic resistance from native competitors and predators if they are to establish successfully in natural habitats. We tested the hypotheses that (1) artificial structures (e. g., suspended aquaculture installations) present a niche opportunity for invasive species by providing a refuge from native benthic predators, and (2) native predators in natural benthic habitats suppress successful colonization by invaders. A recruitment experiment showed that the ascidians Pyura chilensis (native) and Ciona intestinalis (invasive) could recruit to both suspended artificial structures and natural benthic habitats. Ciona, however, was only able to establish adult populations on artificial structures. In natural benthic habitats Ciona only recruited and grew in predator-exclusion cages, because without this protection predation prevented its establishment. In predation experiments, native invertebrate and fish predators removed all invasive ascidians (recruits and adults) in benthic habitats, which contrasted with the high adult survival of the native ascidian P. chilensis. The refuge from a number of benthic predators facilitates the establishment of large populations of invasive species on suspended structures. We present a conceptual model of the invasion processes that includes the anthropogenic structures as a transitional stepping-stone that facilitates invasion by enhancing and prolonging propagule supply to surrounding natural communities. Those established invaders might then overcome biotic resistance during time periods when populations of consumers or competitors are weakened by natural or anthropogenic disturbances. Our results suggest that the conservation of natural habitats with a high diversity of native predators can be an effective means to prevent the spread of invasive species growing on suspended structures. © 2011 The Author(s).en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=1387-3547en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBiological Invasionsen_HK
dc.rightsThe Author(s)en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong Licenseen_US
dc.subjectEnemy releaseen_HK
dc.subjectFoulingen_HK
dc.subjectInvasibilityen_HK
dc.subjectPropagule supplyen_HK
dc.subjectRocky subtidalen_HK
dc.titlePredation contributes to invasion resistance of benthic communities against the non-indigenous tunicate Ciona intestinalisen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4551/resserv?sid=springerlink&genre=article&atitle=Predation contributes to invasion resistance of benthic communities against the non-indigenous tunicate <i>Ciona intestinalis</i>&title=Biological Invasions&issn=13873547&date=2011-09-01&volume=13&issue=9& spage=2023&authors=C. P. Dumont, C. F. Gaymer, M. Thielen_US
dc.identifier.emailDumont, CP: dumont.clement@gmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.authorityDumont, CP=rp00692en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10530-011-0018-7en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80051473287en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros195778-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80051473287&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue9en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2023en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2034en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1573-1464en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000296348000007-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 21 Feb 2012en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDumont, CP=13407874500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGaymer, CF=35606753000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThiel, M=35231340100en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9329228-

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