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Article: Implicit motor learning promotes neural efficiency during laparoscopy

TitleImplicit motor learning promotes neural efficiency during laparoscopy
Authors
KeywordsEEG coherence
Implicit motor learning
Surgery skills
Verbal-analytic processing
Issue Date2011
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00464/
Citation
Surgical Endoscopy And Other Interventional Techniques, 2011, v. 25 n. 9, p. 2950-2955 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground An understanding of differences in expert and novice neural behavior can inform surgical skills training. Outside the surgical domain, electroencephalographic (EEG) coherence analyses have shown that during motor performance, experts display less coactivation between the verbal-analytic and motor planning regions than their less skilled counterparts. Reduced involvement of verbal-analytic processes suggests greater neural efficiency. The authors tested the utility of an implicit motor learning intervention specifically devised to promote neural efficiency by reducing verbal-analytic involvement in laparoscopic performance. Methods In this study, 18 novices practiced a movement pattern on a laparoscopic trainer with either conscious awareness of the movement pattern (explicit motor learning) or suppressed awareness of the movement pattern (implicit motor learning). In a retention test, movement accuracy was compared between the conditions, and coactivation (EEG coherence) was assessed between the motor planning (Fz) region and both the verbal-analytic (T3) and the visuospatial (T4) cortical regions (T3-Fz and T4-Fz, respectively). Results Movement accuracy in the conditions was not different in a retention test (P = 0.231). Findings showed that the EEG coherence scores for the T3-Fz regions were lower for the implicit learners than for the explicit learners (P = 0.027), but no differences were apparent for the T4-Fz regions (P = 0.882). Conclusions Implicit motor learning reduced EEG coactivation between verbal-analytic and motor planning regions, suggesting that verbal-analytic processes were less involved in laparoscopic performance. The findings imply that training techniques that discourage nonessential coactivation during motor performance may provide surgeons with more neural resources with which to manage other aspects of surgery. © 2011 The Author(s).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145091
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.54
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.695
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Economic and Social Research Council, UK
Research Grants Council, Hong KongRES-000-22-3016
Department of Business, Innovation and Skills, UK
Funding Information:

Dr. Jon Maxwell passed away on Sunday, 25 January 2009, during the preparation of this study. Jonny Max inspired us and challenged our thinking always. We were privileged to have the opportunity to work with him. This work was supported by a bilateral research grant from the Economic and Social Research Council, UK, and the Research Grants Council, Hong Kong (RES-000-22-3016), awarded to the third and last authors. Dr Wilson's involvement was facilitated by a 6-month fellowship in Hong Kong funded by the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills, UK.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhu, FFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPoolton, JMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWilson, MRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHu, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMaxwell, JPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-21T05:43:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-21T05:43:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSurgical Endoscopy And Other Interventional Techniques, 2011, v. 25 n. 9, p. 2950-2955en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0930-2794en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145091-
dc.description.abstractBackground An understanding of differences in expert and novice neural behavior can inform surgical skills training. Outside the surgical domain, electroencephalographic (EEG) coherence analyses have shown that during motor performance, experts display less coactivation between the verbal-analytic and motor planning regions than their less skilled counterparts. Reduced involvement of verbal-analytic processes suggests greater neural efficiency. The authors tested the utility of an implicit motor learning intervention specifically devised to promote neural efficiency by reducing verbal-analytic involvement in laparoscopic performance. Methods In this study, 18 novices practiced a movement pattern on a laparoscopic trainer with either conscious awareness of the movement pattern (explicit motor learning) or suppressed awareness of the movement pattern (implicit motor learning). In a retention test, movement accuracy was compared between the conditions, and coactivation (EEG coherence) was assessed between the motor planning (Fz) region and both the verbal-analytic (T3) and the visuospatial (T4) cortical regions (T3-Fz and T4-Fz, respectively). Results Movement accuracy in the conditions was not different in a retention test (P = 0.231). Findings showed that the EEG coherence scores for the T3-Fz regions were lower for the implicit learners than for the explicit learners (P = 0.027), but no differences were apparent for the T4-Fz regions (P = 0.882). Conclusions Implicit motor learning reduced EEG coactivation between verbal-analytic and motor planning regions, suggesting that verbal-analytic processes were less involved in laparoscopic performance. The findings imply that training techniques that discourage nonessential coactivation during motor performance may provide surgeons with more neural resources with which to manage other aspects of surgery. © 2011 The Author(s).en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00464/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniquesen_HK
dc.rightsThe Author(s)en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong Licenseen_US
dc.subjectEEG coherenceen_HK
dc.subjectImplicit motor learningen_HK
dc.subjectSurgery skillsen_HK
dc.subjectVerbal-analytic processingen_HK
dc.titleImplicit motor learning promotes neural efficiency during laparoscopyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4551/resserv?sid=springerlink&genre=article&atitle=Implicit motor learning promotes neural efficiency during laparoscopy&title=Surgical Endoscopy&issn=09302794&date=2011-09-01&volume=25&issue=9& spage=2950&authors=Frank F. Zhu, Jamie M. Poolton, Mark R. Wilson, <i>et al.</i>en_US
dc.identifier.emailPoolton, JM: jamiep@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHu, Y: yhud@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMasters, RSW: mastersr@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPoolton, JM=rp00949en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHu, Y=rp00432en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, RSW=rp00935en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00464-011-1647-8en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21455805-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3160550-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80055065061en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros190888-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80055065061&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume25en_HK
dc.identifier.issue9en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2950en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2955en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1432-2218-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000294219800017-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.relation.projectGaze strategies of laparoscopy surgeons: Observational learning, implicit knowledge and performance in demanding conditions-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhu, FF=35390555200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoolton, JM=8921750800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilson, MR=7408663801en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, Y=7407116091en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMaxwell, JP=7201610565en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMasters, RSW=7102880488en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9110815-

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