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Article: Extracranial head and neck schwannomas: A study of the nerve of origin
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TitleExtracranial head and neck schwannomas: A study of the nerve of origin
 
AuthorsLiu, HL1
Yu, SY1
Li, GKH1
Wei, WI1
 
KeywordsExtracranial
Head
Neck
Nerve of origin
Neurilemmoma
Schwannoma
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherSpringer Berlin / Heidelberg
 
CitationEuropean Archives Of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, 2011, v. 268 n. 9, p. 1343-1347 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00405-011-1491-4
 
AbstractSchwannoma is a type of benign nerve sheath tumour arising from the Schwann cell. Because of the close relationship between the tumour and the nerve of origin (NOO), the operation of extracranial head and neck schwannoma may lead to palsy of major nerve. For this reason, an accurate diagnosis of schwannoma with the identification of the NOO is crucial to the management. The aim of this review was to find out the distribution of the NOO and the usefulness of the investigations in the diagnosis of schwannoma. Medical records of the patients who underwent operation of the extracranial head and neck schwannoma in our division were reviewed. Between January 2000 and December 2009, 30 cases of extracranial head and neck schwannoma were operated. Sympathetic trunk (10, 33%) and vagus nerve (6, 20%) were the two most common NOOs. In five (17%) cases, the NOO was not found to be arising from any major nerve. For these 30 patients, 20 received fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and 26 underwent imaging studies (computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging) before operation. The specificity of FNAC and imaging studies in making the diagnosis of schwannoma was 20 and 38%, respectively. For the patients who had nerve palsies on presentation, their deficits remained after operation. The rate of nerve palsy after tumour excision with division of NOO and intracapsular enucleation was 100 and 67%, respectively. The diagnosis of schwannoma is suggested by clinical features and supported by investigations. Most of the time, the diagnosis can only be confirmed on the histological study of the surgical specimen. Sympathetic trunk and vagus nerve are the two common NOOs. MRI is the investigation of choice in the diagnosis of schwannoma and the identification of NOO. © 2011 The Author(s).
 
ISSN0937-4477
2012 Impact Factor: 1.458
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.737
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00405-011-1491-4
 
PubMed Central IDPMC3149663
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000293554500016
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLiu, HL
 
dc.contributor.authorYu, SY
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, GKH
 
dc.contributor.authorWei, WI
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-21T05:43:39Z
 
dc.date.available2012-02-21T05:43:39Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractSchwannoma is a type of benign nerve sheath tumour arising from the Schwann cell. Because of the close relationship between the tumour and the nerve of origin (NOO), the operation of extracranial head and neck schwannoma may lead to palsy of major nerve. For this reason, an accurate diagnosis of schwannoma with the identification of the NOO is crucial to the management. The aim of this review was to find out the distribution of the NOO and the usefulness of the investigations in the diagnosis of schwannoma. Medical records of the patients who underwent operation of the extracranial head and neck schwannoma in our division were reviewed. Between January 2000 and December 2009, 30 cases of extracranial head and neck schwannoma were operated. Sympathetic trunk (10, 33%) and vagus nerve (6, 20%) were the two most common NOOs. In five (17%) cases, the NOO was not found to be arising from any major nerve. For these 30 patients, 20 received fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and 26 underwent imaging studies (computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging) before operation. The specificity of FNAC and imaging studies in making the diagnosis of schwannoma was 20 and 38%, respectively. For the patients who had nerve palsies on presentation, their deficits remained after operation. The rate of nerve palsy after tumour excision with division of NOO and intracapsular enucleation was 100 and 67%, respectively. The diagnosis of schwannoma is suggested by clinical features and supported by investigations. Most of the time, the diagnosis can only be confirmed on the histological study of the surgical specimen. Sympathetic trunk and vagus nerve are the two common NOOs. MRI is the investigation of choice in the diagnosis of schwannoma and the identification of NOO. © 2011 The Author(s).
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 21 Feb 2012
 
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Archives Of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, 2011, v. 268 n. 9, p. 1343-1347 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00405-011-1491-4
 
dc.identifier.citeulike8767877
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00405-011-1491-4
 
dc.identifier.eissn1434-4726
 
dc.identifier.epage1347
 
dc.identifier.hkuros184436
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000293554500016
 
dc.identifier.issn0937-4477
2012 Impact Factor: 1.458
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.737
 
dc.identifier.issue9
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3149663
 
dc.identifier.pmid21246207
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052741625
 
dc.identifier.spage1343
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145086
 
dc.identifier.volume268
 
dc.languageEng
 
dc.publisherSpringer Berlin / Heidelberg
 
dc.publisher.placeGermany
 
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsThe Author(s)
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subjectExtracranial
 
dc.subjectHead
 
dc.subjectNeck
 
dc.subjectNerve of origin
 
dc.subjectNeurilemmoma
 
dc.subjectSchwannoma
 
dc.titleExtracranial head and neck schwannomas: A study of the nerve of origin
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong