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Article: Ammonia-oxidizing archaea and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in six full-scale wastewater treatment bioreactors
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TitleAmmonia-oxidizing archaea and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in six full-scale wastewater treatment bioreactors
 
AuthorsZhang, T2
Ye, L2
Tong, AHY1
Shao, MF2
Lok, S1
 
Keywords454 Pyrosequencing
Ammonia-oxidizing archaea
Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria
Municipal wastewater treatment plants
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00253/index.htm
 
CitationApplied Microbiology And Biotechnology, 2011, v. 91 n. 4, p. 1215-1225 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-011-3408-y
 
AbstractIn this study, dideoxy sequencing and 454 high-throughput sequencing were used to analyze diversities of the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes and the 16S rRNA genes of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in six municipal wastewater treatment plants. The results showed that AOB amoA genes were quite diverse in different wastewater treatment plants while the 16S rRNA genes were relatively conserved. Based on the observed complexity of amoA and 16S rRNA genes, most of the AOB can be assigned to the Nitrosomonas genus, with Nitrosomonas ureae, Nitrosomonas oligotropha, Nitrosomonas marina, and Nitrosomonas aestuarii being the four most dominant species. From the sequences of the AOA amoA genes, most AOA observed in this study belong to the CGI.1b group, i.e., the soil lineage. The AOB amoA and 16S rRNA genes were quantified by quantitative PCR and 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing, respectively. Although the results from the two approaches show some disconcordance, they both indicated that the abundance of AOB in activated sludge was very low. © 2011 The Author(s).
 
ISSN0175-7598
2013 Impact Factor: 3.811
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-011-3408-y
 
PubMed Central IDPMC3145087
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000293235300034
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong General Research FundHKU7197/08E
HKU
Funding Information:

The authors wish to thank the Hong Kong General Research Fund (HKU7197/08E) for the financial support of this study. Lin Ye wishes to thank HKU for the postgraduate studentship. We would also like to thank W. Chan and C. K. Wong for technical help in pyrosequencing.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorZhang, T
 
dc.contributor.authorYe, L
 
dc.contributor.authorTong, AHY
 
dc.contributor.authorShao, MF
 
dc.contributor.authorLok, S
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-21T05:44:04Z
 
dc.date.available2012-02-21T05:44:04Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractIn this study, dideoxy sequencing and 454 high-throughput sequencing were used to analyze diversities of the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes and the 16S rRNA genes of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in six municipal wastewater treatment plants. The results showed that AOB amoA genes were quite diverse in different wastewater treatment plants while the 16S rRNA genes were relatively conserved. Based on the observed complexity of amoA and 16S rRNA genes, most of the AOB can be assigned to the Nitrosomonas genus, with Nitrosomonas ureae, Nitrosomonas oligotropha, Nitrosomonas marina, and Nitrosomonas aestuarii being the four most dominant species. From the sequences of the AOA amoA genes, most AOA observed in this study belong to the CGI.1b group, i.e., the soil lineage. The AOB amoA and 16S rRNA genes were quantified by quantitative PCR and 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing, respectively. Although the results from the two approaches show some disconcordance, they both indicated that the abundance of AOB in activated sludge was very low. © 2011 The Author(s).
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 21 Feb 2012
 
dc.identifier.citationApplied Microbiology And Biotechnology, 2011, v. 91 n. 4, p. 1215-1225 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-011-3408-y
 
dc.identifier.citeulike9526831
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-011-3408-y
 
dc.identifier.eissn1432-0614
 
dc.identifier.epage1225
 
dc.identifier.hkuros208080
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000293235300034
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong General Research FundHKU7197/08E
HKU
Funding Information:

The authors wish to thank the Hong Kong General Research Fund (HKU7197/08E) for the financial support of this study. Lin Ye wishes to thank HKU for the postgraduate studentship. We would also like to thank W. Chan and C. K. Wong for technical help in pyrosequencing.

 
dc.identifier.issn0175-7598
2013 Impact Factor: 3.811
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3145087
 
dc.identifier.pmid21706171
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052634538
 
dc.identifier.spage1215
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145082
 
dc.identifier.volume91
 
dc.languageEng
 
dc.publisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00253/index.htm
 
dc.publisher.placeGermany
 
dc.relation.ispartofApplied Microbiology and Biotechnology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsThe Author(s)
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject454 Pyrosequencing
 
dc.subjectAmmonia-oxidizing archaea
 
dc.subjectAmmonia-oxidizing bacteria
 
dc.subjectMunicipal wastewater treatment plants
 
dc.titleAmmonia-oxidizing archaea and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in six full-scale wastewater treatment bioreactors
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. The University of Hong Kong