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Article: Residence of Habitat-Specific Anammox Bacteria in the Deep-Sea Subsurface Sediments of the South China Sea: Analyses of Marker Gene Abundance with Physical Chemical Parameters

TitleResidence of Habitat-Specific Anammox Bacteria in the Deep-Sea Subsurface Sediments of the South China Sea: Analyses of Marker Gene Abundance with Physical Chemical Parameters
Authors
KeywordsLife Sciences
Microbiology
Ecology
Geoecology and Natural Processes
Nature Conservation
Issue Date2011
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00248/index.htm
Citation
Microbial Ecology, 2011, v. 62 n. 1, p. 36-47 How to Cite?
AbstractAnaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) has been recognized as an important process for the global nitrogen cycle. In this study, the occurrence and diversity of anammox bacteria in the deep-sea subsurface sediments of the South China Sea (SCS) were investigated. Results indicated that the anammox bacterial sequences recovered from this habitat by amplifying both 16S rRNA gene and hydrazine oxidoreductase encoding hzo gene were all closely related to the Candidatus Scalindua genus. A total of 96 16S rRNA gene sequences from 346 clones were grouped into five subclusters: two subclusters affiliated with the brodae and arabica species, while three new subclusters named zhenghei-I, -II, and -III showed ≤97.4% nucleic acid sequence identity with other known Candidatus Scalindua species. Meanwhile, 88 hzo gene sequences from the sediments also formed five distant subclusters within hzo cluster 1c. Through fluorescent real-time PCR analysis, the abundance of anammox bacteria in deep-sea subsurface sediment was quantified by hzo genes, which ranged from 1.19 × 10 4 to 7.17 × 10 4 copies per gram of dry sediments. Combining all the information from this study, diverse Candidatus Scalindua anammox bacteria were found in the deep-sea subsurface sediments of the SCS, and they could be involved in the nitrogen loss from the fixed inventory in the habitat. © 2011 The Author(s).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145078
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.232
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.346
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Natural Science Foundation of China30800032
41076095
Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department of the Hong Kong SAR Government
Chinese Academy of SciencesKZCX2-YW-QN207
South China Sea Institute of Oceanography, CAS
Funding Information:

This research was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (30800032, 41076095); PhD studentship (ML) and in part by the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department of the Hong Kong SAR Government (J-DG); the Knowledge Innovation Key Project of The Chinese Academy of Sciences (KZCX2-YW-QN207); and South China Sea Open Cruise by R/V Shiyan 3, South China Sea Institute of Oceanography, CAS. We thank Jessie Lai for general laboratory assistance during this study at The University of Hong Kong.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHong, YGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorCao, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGu, JDen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-21T05:44:00Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-21T05:44:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMicrobial Ecology, 2011, v. 62 n. 1, p. 36-47en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0095-3628en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145078-
dc.description.abstractAnaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) has been recognized as an important process for the global nitrogen cycle. In this study, the occurrence and diversity of anammox bacteria in the deep-sea subsurface sediments of the South China Sea (SCS) were investigated. Results indicated that the anammox bacterial sequences recovered from this habitat by amplifying both 16S rRNA gene and hydrazine oxidoreductase encoding hzo gene were all closely related to the Candidatus Scalindua genus. A total of 96 16S rRNA gene sequences from 346 clones were grouped into five subclusters: two subclusters affiliated with the brodae and arabica species, while three new subclusters named zhenghei-I, -II, and -III showed ≤97.4% nucleic acid sequence identity with other known Candidatus Scalindua species. Meanwhile, 88 hzo gene sequences from the sediments also formed five distant subclusters within hzo cluster 1c. Through fluorescent real-time PCR analysis, the abundance of anammox bacteria in deep-sea subsurface sediment was quantified by hzo genes, which ranged from 1.19 × 10 4 to 7.17 × 10 4 copies per gram of dry sediments. Combining all the information from this study, diverse Candidatus Scalindua anammox bacteria were found in the deep-sea subsurface sediments of the SCS, and they could be involved in the nitrogen loss from the fixed inventory in the habitat. © 2011 The Author(s).en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00248/index.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMicrobial Ecologyen_HK
dc.rightsThe Author(s)en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong Licenseen_US
dc.subjectLife Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectMicrobiologyen_US
dc.subjectEcologyen_US
dc.subjectGeoecology and Natural Processesen_US
dc.subjectNature Conservationen_US
dc.titleResidence of Habitat-Specific Anammox Bacteria in the Deep-Sea Subsurface Sediments of the South China Sea: Analyses of Marker Gene Abundance with Physical Chemical Parametersen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4551/resserv?sid=springerlink&genre=article&atitle=Residence of Habitat-Specific Anammox Bacteria in the Deep-Sea Subsurface Sediments of the South China Sea: Analyses of Marker Gene Abundance with Physical Chemical Parameters&title=Microbial Ecology&issn=00953628&date=2011-07-01&volume=62&issue=1& spage=36&authors=Yi-Guo Hong, Meng Li, Huiluo Cao, <i>et al.</i>en_US
dc.identifier.emailGu, JD: jdgu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGu, JD=rp00701en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00248-011-9849-0en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21491114-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3141849-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79960583718en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros194847-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79960583718&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume62en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage36en_HK
dc.identifier.epage47en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1432-184Xen_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000293030400004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 21 Feb 2012en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHong, YG=7403393244en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, M=35210975800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCao, H=37018049400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGu, JD=7403129601en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9201581-

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