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Article: The influence of social-cognitive factors on personal hygiene practices to protect against influenzas: Using modelling to compare avian A/H5N1 and 2009 pandemic A/H1N1 Influenzas in Hong Kong

TitleThe influence of social-cognitive factors on personal hygiene practices to protect against influenzas: Using modelling to compare avian A/H5N1 and 2009 pandemic A/H1N1 Influenzas in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsChinese
Influenza
Personal hygiene practices
Social-cognitive
Trust in information
Issue Date2011
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12529
Citation
International Journal Of Behavioral Medicine, 2011, v. 18 n. 2, p. 93-104 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground Understanding population responses to influenza helps optimize public health interventions. Relevant theoretical frameworks remain nascent. Purpose To model associations between trust in information, perceived hygiene effectiveness, knowledge about the causes of influenza, perceived susceptibility and worry, and personal hygiene practices (PHPs) associated with influenza. Methods Cross-sectional household telephone surveys on avian influenza A/H5N1 (2006) and pandemic influenza A/ H1N1 (2009) gathered comparable data on trust in formal and informal sources of influenza information, influenzarelated knowledge, perceived hygiene effectiveness, worry, perceived susceptibility, and PHPs. Exploratory factor analysis confirmed domain content while confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate the extracted factors. The hypothesized model, compiled from different theoretical frameworks, was optimized with structural equation modelling using the A/H5N1 data. The optimized model was then tested against the A/H1N1 dataset. Results The model was robust across datasets though corresponding path weights differed. Trust in formal information was positively associated with perceived hygiene effectiveness which was positively associated with PHPs in both datasets. Trust in formal information was positively associated with influenza worry in A/H5N1 data, and with knowledge of influenza cause in A/H1N1 data, both variables being positively associated with PHPs. Trust in informal information was positively associated with influenza worry in both datasets. Independent of information trust, perceived influenza susceptibility associated with influenza worry. Worry associated with PHPs in A/H5N1 data only. Conclusions Knowledge of influenza cause and perceived PHP effectiveness were associated with PHPs. Improving trust in formal information should increase PHPs. Worry was significantly associated with PHPs in A/H5N1. © The Author(s) 2010.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145063
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.872
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.905
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiao, Qen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, WWTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-21T05:44:15Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-21T05:44:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Behavioral Medicine, 2011, v. 18 n. 2, p. 93-104en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1070-5503en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145063-
dc.description.abstractBackground Understanding population responses to influenza helps optimize public health interventions. Relevant theoretical frameworks remain nascent. Purpose To model associations between trust in information, perceived hygiene effectiveness, knowledge about the causes of influenza, perceived susceptibility and worry, and personal hygiene practices (PHPs) associated with influenza. Methods Cross-sectional household telephone surveys on avian influenza A/H5N1 (2006) and pandemic influenza A/ H1N1 (2009) gathered comparable data on trust in formal and informal sources of influenza information, influenzarelated knowledge, perceived hygiene effectiveness, worry, perceived susceptibility, and PHPs. Exploratory factor analysis confirmed domain content while confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate the extracted factors. The hypothesized model, compiled from different theoretical frameworks, was optimized with structural equation modelling using the A/H5N1 data. The optimized model was then tested against the A/H1N1 dataset. Results The model was robust across datasets though corresponding path weights differed. Trust in formal information was positively associated with perceived hygiene effectiveness which was positively associated with PHPs in both datasets. Trust in formal information was positively associated with influenza worry in A/H5N1 data, and with knowledge of influenza cause in A/H1N1 data, both variables being positively associated with PHPs. Trust in informal information was positively associated with influenza worry in both datasets. Independent of information trust, perceived influenza susceptibility associated with influenza worry. Worry associated with PHPs in A/H5N1 data only. Conclusions Knowledge of influenza cause and perceived PHP effectiveness were associated with PHPs. Improving trust in formal information should increase PHPs. Worry was significantly associated with PHPs in A/H5N1. © The Author(s) 2010.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12529en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicineen_HK
dc.rightsThe Author(s)en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong Licenseen_US
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectInfluenzaen_HK
dc.subjectPersonal hygiene practicesen_HK
dc.subjectSocial-cognitiveen_HK
dc.subjectTrust in informationen_HK
dc.titleThe influence of social-cognitive factors on personal hygiene practices to protect against influenzas: Using modelling to compare avian A/H5N1 and 2009 pandemic A/H1N1 Influenzas in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4551/resserv?sid=springerlink&genre=article&atitle=The Influence of Social-Cognitive Factors on Personal Hygiene Practices to Protect Against Influenzas: Using Modelling to Compare Avian A/H5N1 and 2009 Pandemic A/H1N1 Influenzas in Hong Kong&title=International Journal of Behavioral Medicine&issn=10705503&date=2011-06-01&volume=18&issue=2& spage=93&authors=Qiuyan Liao, Benjamin J. Cowling, Wendy Wing Tak Lam, <i>et al.</i>en_US
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ:bcowling@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTak Lam, WW:wwtlam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R:fielding@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTak Lam, WW=rp00443en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12529-010-9123-8en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20949342en_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3088805-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79960179068en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros185521-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79960179068&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume18en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage93en_HK
dc.identifier.epage104en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1532-7558en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000290340400003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 21 Feb 2012en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiao, Q=26029481600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowling, BJ=8644765500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTak Lam, WW=7203022022en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFielding, R=7102200484en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8126152-

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