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Article: Diversity and quantity of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in sediment of the Pearl River Estuary, China
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TitleDiversity and quantity of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in sediment of the Pearl River Estuary, China
 
AuthorsJin, T1
Zhang, T1
Ye, L1
Lee, OO2
Wong, YH2
Qian, PY2
 
KeywordsAmmonia monooxygenase α-subunit (amoA) gene
Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA)
Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB)
qPCR
T-RFLP
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00253/index.htm
 
CitationApplied Microbiology And Biotechnology, 2011, v. 90 n. 3, p. 1137-1145 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-011-3107-8
 
AbstractThe diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the sediment of the Pearl River Estuary were investigated by cloning and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). From one sediment sample S16, 36 AOA OTUs (3% cutoff) were obtained from three clone libraries constructed using three primer sets for amoA gene. Among the 36 OTUs, six were shared by all three clone libraries, two appeared in two clone libraries, and the other 28 were only recovered in one of the libraries. For AOB, only seven OTUs (based on 16S rRNA gene) and eight OTUs (based on amoA gene) were obtained, showing lower diversity than AOA. The qPCR results revealed that AOA amoA gene copy numbers ranged from 9.6×10 6 to 5.1×10 7 copies per gram of sediment and AOB amoA gene ranged from 9.5×10 4 to 6.2×10 5 copies per gram of sediment, indicating that the dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in the sediment of the Pearl River Estuary were AOA. The terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism results showed that the relative abundance of AOB species in the sediment samples of different salinity were significantly different, indicating that salinity might be a key factor shaping the AOB community composition. © 2011 The Author(s).
 
ISSN0175-7598
2012 Impact Factor: 3.689
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.307
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-011-3107-8
 
PubMed Central IDPMC3076564
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000289520000033
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong General Research FundHKU7197/08E
HKU
CAS/SAFEA
Funding Information:

The authors wish to thank the Hong Kong General Research Fund (HKU7197/08E) for the financial support of this study, and Lin Ye wish to thank HKU for the postgraduate studentship. This work was partially supported by the CAS/SAFEA International Partnership Program for Creative Research Teams to PY Qian.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorJin, T
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, T
 
dc.contributor.authorYe, L
 
dc.contributor.authorLee, OO
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, YH
 
dc.contributor.authorQian, PY
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-21T05:44:35Z
 
dc.date.available2012-02-21T05:44:35Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractThe diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the sediment of the Pearl River Estuary were investigated by cloning and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). From one sediment sample S16, 36 AOA OTUs (3% cutoff) were obtained from three clone libraries constructed using three primer sets for amoA gene. Among the 36 OTUs, six were shared by all three clone libraries, two appeared in two clone libraries, and the other 28 were only recovered in one of the libraries. For AOB, only seven OTUs (based on 16S rRNA gene) and eight OTUs (based on amoA gene) were obtained, showing lower diversity than AOA. The qPCR results revealed that AOA amoA gene copy numbers ranged from 9.6×10 6 to 5.1×10 7 copies per gram of sediment and AOB amoA gene ranged from 9.5×10 4 to 6.2×10 5 copies per gram of sediment, indicating that the dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in the sediment of the Pearl River Estuary were AOA. The terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism results showed that the relative abundance of AOB species in the sediment samples of different salinity were significantly different, indicating that salinity might be a key factor shaping the AOB community composition. © 2011 The Author(s).
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 21 Feb 2012
 
dc.identifier.citationApplied Microbiology And Biotechnology, 2011, v. 90 n. 3, p. 1137-1145 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-011-3107-8
 
dc.identifier.citeulike8784904
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-011-3107-8
 
dc.identifier.eissn1432-0614
 
dc.identifier.epage1145
 
dc.identifier.hkuros192704
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000289520000033
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong General Research FundHKU7197/08E
HKU
CAS/SAFEA
Funding Information:

The authors wish to thank the Hong Kong General Research Fund (HKU7197/08E) for the financial support of this study, and Lin Ye wish to thank HKU for the postgraduate studentship. This work was partially supported by the CAS/SAFEA International Partnership Program for Creative Research Teams to PY Qian.

 
dc.identifier.issn0175-7598
2012 Impact Factor: 3.689
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.307
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3076564
 
dc.identifier.pmid21286709
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79954661546
 
dc.identifier.spage1137
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145057
 
dc.identifier.volume90
 
dc.languageEng
 
dc.publisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00253/index.htm
 
dc.publisher.placeGermany
 
dc.relation.ispartofApplied Microbiology and Biotechnology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsThe Author(s)
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject.meshAmmonia - metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshArchaea - classification - genetics - isolation and purification - metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshBacteria - classification - genetics - isolation and purification - metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshBiodiversity
 
dc.subject.meshGeologic Sediments - microbiology
 
dc.subjectAmmonia monooxygenase α-subunit (amoA) gene
 
dc.subjectAmmonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA)
 
dc.subjectAmmonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB)
 
dc.subjectqPCR
 
dc.subjectT-RFLP
 
dc.titleDiversity and quantity of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in sediment of the Pearl River Estuary, China
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Hong Kong University of Science and Technology