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Article: Distribution and abiotic influences on hypolithic microbial communities in an Antarctic Dry Valley

TitleDistribution and abiotic influences on hypolithic microbial communities in an Antarctic Dry Valley
Authors
KeywordsAntarctica
Cryptic microbial communities
Hypolithons
Microniches
Miers valley
Issue Date2011
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00300/index.htm
Citation
Polar Biology, 2011, v. 34 n. 2, p. 307-311 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Miers Valley within the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica supports abundant quartz and marble substrates for hypolithons-microbial colonists on the underside of these translucent rocks. Three physically distinct hypolithic community types have been identified: cyanobacteria dominated (Type I), fungus dominated (Type II) or moss dominated (Type III). The distribution of the three types was mapped across much of the ~75 km 2 area of the upper Miers Valley and correlated this with the measurements of selected micro-environmental variables. Type I hypolithons were most common and occurred at all altitudes up to 824 m, whilst Type II and Type III hypolithons were less abundant and restricted to lower altitudes on the valley floor (<415 m and <257 m, respectively). Whilst all colonized quartz effectively filtered incident UVB irradiance, transmittance levels for UVA and PAR varied markedly and were significant in determining hypolith type. Notably, the Type I hypolithons occurred under rocks with a significantly lower transmittance of photosynthetically active radiation than Type II and III hypolithons. Altitude and aspect were also significant factors determining hypolith type, and a role for altitude-related abiotic variables in determining the distribution of Type I, II and III hypolithons is proposed. © 2010 The Author(s).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145036
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.711
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.983
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Australian Antarctic DivisionASAC 2355
Waikato University
National Research Foundation
Hong Kong Research Grants Council7733/08MM
Antarctica New Zealand
NZ Foundation for Research Science & Technology (Terrestrial Antarctic Biocomplexity Survey, nzTABS)
Funding Information:

This research was undertaken under the auspices of the South African Antarctic Research Project, Australian Antarctic Division (ASAC 2355) and the Waikato University Antarctic Terrestrial Biology Research Program. We thank Irfan Jones and Brian Storey (Gateway Antarctica, Univ. of Canterbury, NZ) for preparing Fig. 1. The authors gratefully acknowledge funding from the National Research Foundation (SA), the Hong Kong Research Grants Council (7733/08MM), Antarctica New Zealand and the NZ Foundation for Research Science & Technology (Terrestrial Antarctic Biocomplexity Survey, nzTABS).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCowan, DAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPointing, SBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorStevens, MIen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCraig Cary, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorStomeo, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTuffin, IMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-21T05:43:02Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-21T05:43:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPolar Biology, 2011, v. 34 n. 2, p. 307-311en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0722-4060en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145036-
dc.description.abstractThe Miers Valley within the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica supports abundant quartz and marble substrates for hypolithons-microbial colonists on the underside of these translucent rocks. Three physically distinct hypolithic community types have been identified: cyanobacteria dominated (Type I), fungus dominated (Type II) or moss dominated (Type III). The distribution of the three types was mapped across much of the ~75 km 2 area of the upper Miers Valley and correlated this with the measurements of selected micro-environmental variables. Type I hypolithons were most common and occurred at all altitudes up to 824 m, whilst Type II and Type III hypolithons were less abundant and restricted to lower altitudes on the valley floor (<415 m and <257 m, respectively). Whilst all colonized quartz effectively filtered incident UVB irradiance, transmittance levels for UVA and PAR varied markedly and were significant in determining hypolith type. Notably, the Type I hypolithons occurred under rocks with a significantly lower transmittance of photosynthetically active radiation than Type II and III hypolithons. Altitude and aspect were also significant factors determining hypolith type, and a role for altitude-related abiotic variables in determining the distribution of Type I, II and III hypolithons is proposed. © 2010 The Author(s).en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00300/index.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPolar Biologyen_HK
dc.rightsThe Author(s)en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong Licenseen_US
dc.subjectAntarcticaen_HK
dc.subjectCryptic microbial communitiesen_HK
dc.subjectHypolithonsen_HK
dc.subjectMicronichesen_HK
dc.subjectMiers valleyen_HK
dc.titleDistribution and abiotic influences on hypolithic microbial communities in an Antarctic Dry Valleyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4551/resserv?sid=springerlink&genre=article&atitle=Distribution and abiotic influences on hypolithic microbial communities in an Antarctic Dry Valley&title=Polar Biology&issn=07224060&date=2011-02-01&volume=34&issue=2& spage=307&authors=Don A. Cowan, Stephen B. Pointing, Mark I. Stevens, <i>et al.</i>en_US
dc.identifier.emailPointing, SB: pointing@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPointing, SB=rp00771en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00300-010-0872-2en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79551680486en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79551680486&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume34en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage307en_HK
dc.identifier.epage311en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1432-2056en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000287904600015-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_HK
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 21 Feb 2012en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowan, DA=24425600900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPointing, SB=6603986412en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStevens, MI=13606264200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCraig Cary, S=9240110000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStomeo, F=24377175100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTuffin, IM=36945566200en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7770966-

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