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Article: Characterization and quantification of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) in a nitrogen-removing reactor using T-RFLP and qPCR
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TitleCharacterization and quantification of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) in a nitrogen-removing reactor using T-RFLP and qPCR
 
AuthorsZhang, T1
Jin, T1
Yan, Q1
 
KeywordsAmmonia monooxygenase α-subunit (amoA) gene
Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB)
QPCR
T-RFLP
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00253/index.htm
 
CitationApplied Microbiology And Biotechnology, 2010, v. 87 n. 3, p. 1167-1176 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-010-2595-2
 
AbstractUsing ammonia monooxygenase α-subunit (amoA) gene and 16S rRNA gene, the community structure and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in a nitrogen-removing reactor, which was operated for five phases, were characterized and quantified by cloning, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results suggested that the dominant AOB in the reactor fell to the genus Nitrosomonas, while the dominant AOA belonged to Crenarchaeotal Group I.1a in phylum Crenarchaeota. Real-time PCR results demonstrated that the levels of AOB amoA varied from 2.9×10 3 to 2.3×10 5 copies per nanogram DNA, greatly (about 60 times) higher than those of AOA, which ranged from 1.7× 10 2 to 3.8× 10 3 copies per nanogram DNA. This indicated the possible leading role of AOB in the nitrification process in this study. T-RFLP results showed that the AOB community structure significantly shifted in different phases while AOA only showed one major peak for all the phases. The analyses also suggested that the AOB community was more sensitive than that of AOA to operational conditions, such as ammonia loading and dissolved oxygen. © The Author(s) 2010.
 
ISSN0175-7598
2013 Impact Factor: 3.811
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-010-2595-2
 
PubMed Central IDPMC2886134
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000278810200033
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong General Research FundHKU7197/08E
HKU
Funding Information:

The authors wish to thank the Hong Kong General Research Fund (HKU7197/08E) for the financial support of this study, and Qingmei Yan wish to thank HKU for the postgraduate studentship.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorZhang, T
 
dc.contributor.authorJin, T
 
dc.contributor.authorYan, Q
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-21T05:43:26Z
 
dc.date.available2012-02-21T05:43:26Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractUsing ammonia monooxygenase α-subunit (amoA) gene and 16S rRNA gene, the community structure and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in a nitrogen-removing reactor, which was operated for five phases, were characterized and quantified by cloning, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results suggested that the dominant AOB in the reactor fell to the genus Nitrosomonas, while the dominant AOA belonged to Crenarchaeotal Group I.1a in phylum Crenarchaeota. Real-time PCR results demonstrated that the levels of AOB amoA varied from 2.9×10 3 to 2.3×10 5 copies per nanogram DNA, greatly (about 60 times) higher than those of AOA, which ranged from 1.7× 10 2 to 3.8× 10 3 copies per nanogram DNA. This indicated the possible leading role of AOB in the nitrification process in this study. T-RFLP results showed that the AOB community structure significantly shifted in different phases while AOA only showed one major peak for all the phases. The analyses also suggested that the AOB community was more sensitive than that of AOA to operational conditions, such as ammonia loading and dissolved oxygen. © The Author(s) 2010.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 21 Feb 2012
 
dc.identifier.citationApplied Microbiology And Biotechnology, 2010, v. 87 n. 3, p. 1167-1176 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-010-2595-2
 
dc.identifier.citeulike7080021
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-010-2595-2
 
dc.identifier.eissn1432-0614
 
dc.identifier.epage1176
 
dc.identifier.hkuros175526
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000278810200033
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong General Research FundHKU7197/08E
HKU
Funding Information:

The authors wish to thank the Hong Kong General Research Fund (HKU7197/08E) for the financial support of this study, and Qingmei Yan wish to thank HKU for the postgraduate studentship.

 
dc.identifier.issn0175-7598
2013 Impact Factor: 3.811
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2886134
 
dc.identifier.pmid20405121
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77955600012
 
dc.identifier.spage1167
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144983
 
dc.identifier.volume87
 
dc.languageEng
 
dc.publisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00253/index.htm
 
dc.publisher.placeGermany
 
dc.relation.ispartofApplied Microbiology and Biotechnology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsThe Author(s)
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject.meshAmmonia - metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshArchaea - classification - genetics - isolation and purification - metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshBacteria - classification - genetics - isolation and purification - metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshBioreactors - microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshNitrogen - metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
 
dc.subjectAmmonia monooxygenase α-subunit (amoA) gene
 
dc.subjectAmmonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB)
 
dc.subjectQPCR
 
dc.subjectT-RFLP
 
dc.titleCharacterization and quantification of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) in a nitrogen-removing reactor using T-RFLP and qPCR
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong