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Article: Perceived Threat, Risk Perception, and Efficacy Beliefs Related to SARS and Other (Emerging) Infectious Diseases: Results of an International Survey

TitlePerceived Threat, Risk Perception, and Efficacy Beliefs Related to SARS and Other (Emerging) Infectious Diseases: Results of an International Survey
Authors
KeywordsPsychology
Health Psychology
Public Health, general
Stress and Coping
Primary Care Medicine
General Practice and Family Medicine
Cross Cultural Psychology
Issue Date2009
PublisherSpringer Boston
Citation
International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 2009, v. 16, n. 1, p. 30-40 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: To study the levels of perceived threat, perceived severity, perceived vulnerability, response efficacy, and self-efficacy for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and eight other diseases in five European and three Asian countries. Method: A computer-assisted phone survey was conducted among 3,436 respondents. The questionnaire focused on perceived threat, vulnerability, severity, response efficacy, and self-efficacy related to SARS and eight other diseases. Results: Perceived threat of SARS in case of an outbreak in the country was higher than that of other diseases. Perceived vulnerability of SARS was at an intermediate level and perceived severity was high compared to other diseases. Perceived threat for SARS varied between countries in Europe and Asia with a higher perceived severity of SARS in Europe and a higher perceived vulnerability in Asia. Response efficacy and self-efficacy for SARS were higher in Asia compared to Europe. In multiple linear regression analyses, country was strongly associated with perceived threat. Conclusions: The relatively high perceived threat for SARS indicates that it is seen as a public health risk and offers a basis for communication in case of an outbreak. The strong association between perceived threat and country and different regional patterns require further research. © 2009 International Society of Behavioral Medicine.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144949
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.872
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.905
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

Smith RD. Responding to global infectious diseases outbreaks: lessons from SARS on the role of risk perception, communication and management. Soc Sci Med. 2006;63:3113–23. doi: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2006.08.004

Brewer NT, Chapman GB, Gibbons FX, Gerard M, McCaul KD, Weinstein ND. A meta-analysis of the relationship between risk perception and health behavior: the example of vaccination. Health Psychol. 2007;26 2:136–45. doi: 10.1037/0278-6133.26.2.136

Sjoberg L. Factors in risk perception. Risk Anal. 2000;20 1:1–11. doi: 10.1111/0272-4332.00001

Weinstein ND. The precaution adoption process. Health Psychol. 1988;7 4:355–86. doi: 10.1037/0278-6133.7.4.355

Slovic P. Perception of risk. Science. 1987;236:280–85. doi: 10.1126/science.3563507

Weinstein N. Why it won’t happen to me: perceptions of risk factors and susceptibility. Health Psychol. 1984;3:431–57. doi: 10.1037/0278-6133.3.5.431

Blendon R, Benson JM, DesRoches CM, Raleigh E, Taylor-Clark K. The public’s response to severe acute respiratory syndrome in Toronto and the United States. Clin Infect Dis 2004;38:925–31. doi: 10.1086/382355

Lau J, Yang X, Tsui H, Kim JH. Monitoring community responses to the SARS epidemic in Hong Kong: from day 10 to day 62. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2003;57:864–70. doi: 10.1136/jech.57.11.864

Leung G, Lam TH, Ho LM, Ho SY, Chan BH, Wong IO, et al. The impact of community psychological responses on outbreak control for severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kong. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2003;57:857–63. doi: 10.1136/jech.57.11.857

Ji L, Zhang Z, Usborne E, Guan Y. Optimism across cultures: in response to the severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak. Asian J Soc Psychol. 2004;7:25–34. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-839X.2004.00132.x

Vartti A-M, Oenema A, Schreck M, Uutela A, de Zwart O, Brug J, et al. SARS knowledge, perceptions, and behaviors: a comparison between Finns and the Dutch during the SARS Outbreak in 2003. Int J Behav. Med doi:10.1007/s12529-008-9004-6.

Chang ED, Asawaka K. Cultural variations in optimistic bias: do Easterns really expect the worst and Westerns really expect the best when predicting future life events? J Pers Soc Psychol. 2001;81 3:476–91. doi: 10.1037/0022-3514.81.3.476

Chang ED, Asawaka K. Cultural variations on optimistic and pessimistic bias for self versus a sibling: is there evidence for self-enhancement in the West and for self-criticism in the East when the referent group is specified. J Pers Soc Psychol. 2003;84 3:569–81. doi: 10.1037/0022-3514.84.3.569

Mullet E, Lazreg C, Candela C, Neto F. The Scandinavian way of perceiving societal risks. J Risk Res. 2005;8 1:19–30. doi: 10.1080/13669870210158571

Voeten HACM, de Zwart O, Veldhuijzen IK, Yuen C, Jiang X, Elam G, et al. Sources of information and health beliefs related to SARS and avian influenza among Chinese communities in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands, compared to the general population in these countries. Int J Behav Med. doi:10.1007/s12529-008-9006-4.

Poortinga W, Bickerstaff K, Langford I, Niewöhner J, Pidgeon N. The British 2001 food and mouth crisis: a comparative study of public risk perceptions, trust, beliefs about government policy in two communities. J Risk Res. 2004;7:73–90. doi: 10.1080/1366987042000151205

Bonneux L, Van Damme W. An iatrogenic pandemic of fear. Br Med J. 2006;332 7544:786–8. doi: 10.1136/bmj.332.7544.786

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorde Zwart, Oen_US
dc.contributor.authorVeldhuijzen, IKen_US
dc.contributor.authorElam, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorAro, ARen_US
dc.contributor.authorAbraham, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorBishop, GDen_US
dc.contributor.authorVoeten, HACMen_US
dc.contributor.authorRichardus, JHen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrug, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-21T05:43:32Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-21T05:43:32Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 2009, v. 16, n. 1, p. 30-40en_US
dc.identifier.issn1070-5503en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144949-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To study the levels of perceived threat, perceived severity, perceived vulnerability, response efficacy, and self-efficacy for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and eight other diseases in five European and three Asian countries. Method: A computer-assisted phone survey was conducted among 3,436 respondents. The questionnaire focused on perceived threat, vulnerability, severity, response efficacy, and self-efficacy related to SARS and eight other diseases. Results: Perceived threat of SARS in case of an outbreak in the country was higher than that of other diseases. Perceived vulnerability of SARS was at an intermediate level and perceived severity was high compared to other diseases. Perceived threat for SARS varied between countries in Europe and Asia with a higher perceived severity of SARS in Europe and a higher perceived vulnerability in Asia. Response efficacy and self-efficacy for SARS were higher in Asia compared to Europe. In multiple linear regression analyses, country was strongly associated with perceived threat. Conclusions: The relatively high perceived threat for SARS indicates that it is seen as a public health risk and offers a basis for communication in case of an outbreak. The strong association between perceived threat and country and different regional patterns require further research. © 2009 International Society of Behavioral Medicine.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Bostonen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicineen_US
dc.rightsThe Author(s)en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong Licenseen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectHealth Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectPublic Health, generalen_US
dc.subjectStress and Copingen_US
dc.subjectPrimary Care Medicineen_US
dc.subjectGeneral Practice and Family Medicineen_US
dc.subjectCross Cultural Psychologyen_US
dc.titlePerceived Threat, Risk Perception, and Efficacy Beliefs Related to SARS and Other (Emerging) Infectious Diseases: Results of an International Surveyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4551/resserv?sid=springerlink&genre=article&atitle=Perceived Threat, Risk Perception, and Efficacy Beliefs Related to SARS and Other (Emerging) Infectious Diseases: Results of an International Survey&title=International Journal of Behavioral Medicine&issn=10705503&date=2009-03-01&volume=16&issue=1& spage=30&authors=Onno de Zwart, Irene K. Veldhuijzen, Gillian Elam, <i>et al.</i>en_US
dc.identifier.emailAbraham, T: thomas@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityThomas Abraham=rp00578en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12529-008-9008-2en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19125335-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2691522-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-62149131843en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros148424-
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dc.identifier.volume16en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage30en_US
dc.identifier.epage40en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1532-7558en_US
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dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 21 Feb 2012en_US
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