File Download
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: Low handgrip strength is a predictor of osteoporotic fractures: Cross-sectional and prospective evidence from the Hong Kong Osteoporosis Study
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleLow handgrip strength is a predictor of osteoporotic fractures: Cross-sectional and prospective evidence from the Hong Kong Osteoporosis Study
 
AuthorsCheung, CL1
Tan, KCB1
Bow, CH1
Soong, CSS1
Loong, CHN1
Kung, AWC1
 
KeywordsFalls
Fracture
Handgrip strength
Osteoporosis
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherSpringer Netherlands. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springerlink.com/content/0161-9152/
 
CitationAge, 2012, v. 34 n. 5, p. 1239-1248 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11357-011-9297-2
 
AbstractHandgrip strength (HGS) is a potentially useful objective parameter to predict fracture since it is an indicator of general muscle strength and is associated with fragility and propensity to fall. Our objective was to examine the association of HGS with fracture, to evaluate the accuracy of HGS in predicting incident fracture, and to identify subjects at risk of fracture. We analyzed a cross-sectional cohort with 2,793 subjects (1,217 men and 1,576 women aged 50-101 years) and a subset of 1,702 subjects which were followed for a total of 4,855 person-years. The primary outcome measures were prevalent fractures and incident major fragility fractures. Each standard deviation (SD) reduction in HGS was associated with a 1.24-fold increased odds for major clinical fractures even after adjustment for other clinical factors. A similar result was obtained in the prospective cohort with each SD reduction in HGS being associated with a 1.57-fold increased hazard ratio of fracture even after adjustment for clinical factors. A combination of HGS and femoral neck bone mineral density (FN BMD) T-score values (combined T-score), together with other clinical factors, had a better predictive power of incident fractures than FN BMD or HGS T-score alone with clinical factors. In addition, combined T-score has better sensitivity and specificity in predicting incidence fractures than FN BMD alone. This study is the first study to compare the predictive ability of HGS and BMD. We showed that HGS is an independent risk factor for major clinical fractures. Compared with using FN BMD T-score of -2.5 alone, HGS alone has a comparable predictive power to BMD, and the combined T-score may be useful to identify extra subjects at risk of clinical fractures with improved specificity. © The Author(s) 2011.
 
ISSN0161-9152
2012 Impact Factor: 4.084
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.661
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11357-011-9297-2
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorCheung, CL
 
dc.contributor.authorTan, KCB
 
dc.contributor.authorBow, CH
 
dc.contributor.authorSoong, CSS
 
dc.contributor.authorLoong, CHN
 
dc.contributor.authorKung, AWC
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-21T05:43:19Z
 
dc.date.available2012-02-21T05:43:19Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractHandgrip strength (HGS) is a potentially useful objective parameter to predict fracture since it is an indicator of general muscle strength and is associated with fragility and propensity to fall. Our objective was to examine the association of HGS with fracture, to evaluate the accuracy of HGS in predicting incident fracture, and to identify subjects at risk of fracture. We analyzed a cross-sectional cohort with 2,793 subjects (1,217 men and 1,576 women aged 50-101 years) and a subset of 1,702 subjects which were followed for a total of 4,855 person-years. The primary outcome measures were prevalent fractures and incident major fragility fractures. Each standard deviation (SD) reduction in HGS was associated with a 1.24-fold increased odds for major clinical fractures even after adjustment for other clinical factors. A similar result was obtained in the prospective cohort with each SD reduction in HGS being associated with a 1.57-fold increased hazard ratio of fracture even after adjustment for clinical factors. A combination of HGS and femoral neck bone mineral density (FN BMD) T-score values (combined T-score), together with other clinical factors, had a better predictive power of incident fractures than FN BMD or HGS T-score alone with clinical factors. In addition, combined T-score has better sensitivity and specificity in predicting incidence fractures than FN BMD alone. This study is the first study to compare the predictive ability of HGS and BMD. We showed that HGS is an independent risk factor for major clinical fractures. Compared with using FN BMD T-score of -2.5 alone, HGS alone has a comparable predictive power to BMD, and the combined T-score may be useful to identify extra subjects at risk of clinical fractures with improved specificity. © The Author(s) 2011.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 21 Feb 2012
 
dc.identifier.citationAge, 2012, v. 34 n. 5, p. 1239-1248 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11357-011-9297-2
 
dc.identifier.citeulike9822336
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11357-011-9297-2
 
dc.identifier.eissn1574-4647
 
dc.identifier.epage1248
 
dc.identifier.hkuros192167
 
dc.identifier.issn0161-9152
2012 Impact Factor: 4.084
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.661
 
dc.identifier.issue5
 
dc.identifier.pmid21853264
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84867575842
 
dc.identifier.spage1239
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144931
 
dc.identifier.volume34
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherSpringer Netherlands. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springerlink.com/content/0161-9152/
 
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
 
dc.relation.ispartofAge
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subjectFalls
 
dc.subjectFracture
 
dc.subjectHandgrip strength
 
dc.subjectOsteoporosis
 
dc.titleLow handgrip strength is a predictor of osteoporotic fractures: Cross-sectional and prospective evidence from the Hong Kong Osteoporosis Study
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Cheung, CL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tan, KCB</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Bow, CH</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Soong, CSS</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Loong, CHN</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Kung, AWC</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-02-21T05:43:19Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2012-02-21T05:43:19Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2012</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Age, 2012, v. 34 n. 5, p. 1239-1248</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>0161-9152</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/144931</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>Handgrip strength (HGS) is a potentially useful objective parameter to predict fracture since it is an indicator of general muscle strength and is associated with fragility and propensity to fall. Our objective was to examine the association of HGS with fracture, to evaluate the accuracy of HGS in predicting incident fracture, and to identify subjects at risk of fracture. We analyzed a cross-sectional cohort with 2,793 subjects (1,217 men and 1,576 women aged 50-101 years) and a subset of 1,702 subjects which were followed for a total of 4,855 person-years. The primary outcome measures were prevalent fractures and incident major fragility fractures. Each standard deviation (SD) reduction in HGS was associated with a 1.24-fold increased odds for major clinical fractures even after adjustment for other clinical factors. A similar result was obtained in the prospective cohort with each SD reduction in HGS being associated with a 1.57-fold increased hazard ratio of fracture even after adjustment for clinical factors. A combination of HGS and femoral neck bone mineral density (FN BMD) T-score values (combined T-score), together with other clinical factors, had a better predictive power of incident fractures than FN BMD or HGS T-score alone with clinical factors. In addition, combined T-score has better sensitivity and specificity in predicting incidence fractures than FN BMD alone. This study is the first study to compare the predictive ability of HGS and BMD. We showed that HGS is an independent risk factor for major clinical fractures. Compared with using FN BMD T-score of -2.5 alone, HGS alone has a comparable predictive power to BMD, and the combined T-score may be useful to identify extra subjects at risk of clinical fractures with improved specificity. &#169; The Author(s) 2011.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>Springer Netherlands. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://www.springerlink.com/content/0161-9152/</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>Age</relation.ispartof>
<rights>Creative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License</rights>
<subject>Falls</subject>
<subject>Fracture</subject>
<subject>Handgrip strength</subject>
<subject>Osteoporosis</subject>
<title>Low handgrip strength is a predictor of osteoporotic fractures: Cross-sectional and prospective evidence from the Hong Kong Osteoporosis Study</title>
<type>Article</type>
<description.nature>published_or_final_version</description.nature>
<identifier.doi>10.1007/s11357-011-9297-2</identifier.doi>
<identifier.pmid>21853264</identifier.pmid>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-84867575842</identifier.scopus>
<identifier.hkuros>192167</identifier.hkuros>
<relation.references>http://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84867575842&amp;selection=ref&amp;src=s&amp;origin=recordpage</relation.references>
<identifier.volume>34</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>5</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>1239</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>1248</identifier.epage>
<identifier.eissn>1574-4647</identifier.eissn>
<publisher.place>Netherlands</publisher.place>
<description.other>Springer Open Choice, 21 Feb 2012</description.other>
<identifier.citeulike>9822336</identifier.citeulike>
<bitstream.url>http://hub.hku.hk/bitstream/10722/144931/1/fulltext.pdf</bitstream.url>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong