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Article: Oral health of Chinese people with systemic sclerosis
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TitleOral health of Chinese people with systemic sclerosis
 
AuthorsChu, CH2
Yeung, CMK2
Lai, IA2
Leung, WK2
Mok, MY1
 
KeywordsCaries
Chinese
Periodontal status
Scleroderma
Systemic Sclerosis
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00784/index.htm
 
CitationClinical Oral Investigations, 2011, v. 15 n. 6, p. 931-939 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00784-010-0472-0
 
AbstractThe aim was to study oral health status, salivary function, and oral features of Chinese people with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). Chinese people with SSc attending a university specialist clinic were invited for a questionnaire survey and a clinical examination. Ethics approval was sought (UW 08-305). Gender- and age-matched individuals without SSc who attended a university dental hospital were recruited for comparison. Forty-two SSc patients with a mean age of 54.0 ± 12.2 were examined. This study found no Chinese people with systemic sclerosis were periodontally healthy and many (76%) had periodontal pockets despite most of them (93%) practiced daily tooth-brushing. They all had caries experience (DMFT = 10.5) and many (65%) had untreated decay. Mucosal telangiectasia was a common oral feature (80%). They had lower resting salivary flow rates (0.18 ± 0.17 ml/min vs. 0.31 ± 0.21 ml/min; p = 0.003) and pH values (6.90 ± 0.40 vs. 7.28 ± 0.31; p < 0.001) and reduced maximal mouth opening (40.1 ± 6.5 mm vs. 43.6 ± 7.0 mm) than people without SSc. © 2010 The Author(s).
 
ISSN1432-6981
2013 Impact Factor: 2.285
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00784-010-0472-0
 
PubMed Central IDPMC3212684
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000296879800011
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong Research and Conference200807176127
Funding Information:

We would like to thank dental undergraduate student group 5.3 of graduation class 2009 for their participation in this study. The work described in this paper was substantially supported by The University of Hong Kong Research and Conference Grant 200807176127.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChu, CH
 
dc.contributor.authorYeung, CMK
 
dc.contributor.authorLai, IA
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, WK
 
dc.contributor.authorMok, MY
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-21T05:43:57Z
 
dc.date.available2012-02-21T05:43:57Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractThe aim was to study oral health status, salivary function, and oral features of Chinese people with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). Chinese people with SSc attending a university specialist clinic were invited for a questionnaire survey and a clinical examination. Ethics approval was sought (UW 08-305). Gender- and age-matched individuals without SSc who attended a university dental hospital were recruited for comparison. Forty-two SSc patients with a mean age of 54.0 ± 12.2 were examined. This study found no Chinese people with systemic sclerosis were periodontally healthy and many (76%) had periodontal pockets despite most of them (93%) practiced daily tooth-brushing. They all had caries experience (DMFT = 10.5) and many (65%) had untreated decay. Mucosal telangiectasia was a common oral feature (80%). They had lower resting salivary flow rates (0.18 ± 0.17 ml/min vs. 0.31 ± 0.21 ml/min; p = 0.003) and pH values (6.90 ± 0.40 vs. 7.28 ± 0.31; p < 0.001) and reduced maximal mouth opening (40.1 ± 6.5 mm vs. 43.6 ± 7.0 mm) than people without SSc. © 2010 The Author(s).
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 21 Feb 2012
 
dc.identifier.citationClinical Oral Investigations, 2011, v. 15 n. 6, p. 931-939 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00784-010-0472-0
 
dc.identifier.citeulike8026308
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00784-010-0472-0
 
dc.identifier.eissn1436-3771
 
dc.identifier.epage939
 
dc.identifier.hkuros198107
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000296879800011
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong Research and Conference200807176127
Funding Information:

We would like to thank dental undergraduate student group 5.3 of graduation class 2009 for their participation in this study. The work described in this paper was substantially supported by The University of Hong Kong Research and Conference Grant 200807176127.

 
dc.identifier.issn1432-6981
2013 Impact Factor: 2.285
 
dc.identifier.issue6
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3212684
 
dc.identifier.pmid20938795
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80955131137
 
dc.identifier.spage931
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144882
 
dc.identifier.volume15
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00784/index.htm
 
dc.publisher.placeGermany
 
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Oral Investigations
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subjectCaries
 
dc.subjectChinese
 
dc.subjectPeriodontal status
 
dc.subjectScleroderma
 
dc.subjectSystemic Sclerosis
 
dc.titleOral health of Chinese people with systemic sclerosis
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Yeung, CMK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lai, IA</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Leung, WK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Mok, MY</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>The aim was to study oral health status, salivary function, and oral features of Chinese people with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). Chinese people with SSc attending a university specialist clinic were invited for a questionnaire survey and a clinical examination. Ethics approval was sought (UW 08-305). Gender- and age-matched individuals without SSc who attended a university dental hospital were recruited for comparison. Forty-two SSc patients with a mean age of 54.0 &#177; 12.2 were examined. This study found no Chinese people with systemic sclerosis were periodontally healthy and many (76%) had periodontal pockets despite most of them (93%) practiced daily tooth-brushing. They all had caries experience (DMFT = 10.5) and many (65%) had untreated decay. Mucosal telangiectasia was a common oral feature (80%). They had lower resting salivary flow rates (0.18 &#177; 0.17 ml/min vs. 0.31 &#177; 0.21 ml/min; p = 0.003) and pH values (6.90 &#177; 0.40 vs. 7.28 &#177; 0.31; p &lt; 0.001) and reduced maximal mouth opening (40.1 &#177; 6.5 mm vs. 43.6 &#177; 7.0 mm) than people without SSc. &#169; 2010 The Author(s).</description.abstract>
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<subject>Caries</subject>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. Prince Philip Dental Hospital