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Article: 'Out-of-Africa' dispersal of tropical floras during the Miocene climatic optimum: Evidence from Uvaria (Annonaceae)

Title'Out-of-Africa' dispersal of tropical floras during the Miocene climatic optimum: Evidence from Uvaria (Annonaceae)
Authors
KeywordsAfrica-Asia disjunction
Ancestral area
Angiosperms
Annonaceae
Historical biogeography
Long-distance dispersal
Migration
Tropical forests
Issue Date2012
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JBI
Citation
Journal Of Biogeography, 2012, v. 39 n. 2, p. 322-335 How to Cite?
AbstractAim African-Asian disjunctions are common in palaeotropical taxa, and are typically explained by reference to three competing hypotheses: (1) 'rafting' on the Indian tectonic plate, enabling Africa-to-Asia dispersal; (2) migration via Eocene boreotropical forests; and (3) transoceanic long-distance dispersal. These hypotheses are tested using Uvaria (Annonaceae), which is distributed in tropical regions of Africa, Asia and Australasia. Recent phylogenetic reconstructions of the genus show a clear correlation with geographical provenance, indicating a probable origin in Africa and subsequent dispersal to Asia and then Australasia. Ancestral areas and migration routes are inferred and compared with estimates of divergence times in order to distinguish between the prevailing dispersal hypotheses. Location Palaeotropics. Methods Divergence times in Uvaria are estimated by analysing the sequences of four DNA regions (matK, psbA-trnH spacer, rbcL and trnL-F) from 59 Uvaria species and 77 outgroup species, using a Bayesian uncorrelated lognormal (UCLD) relaxed molecular clock. The ancestral area of Uvaria and subsequent dispersal routes are inferred using statistical dispersal-vicariance analysis (s-diva). Results Uvaria is estimated to have originated in continental Africa 31.6Ma [95% highest posterior density (HPD): 38.4-25.1Ma] between the Middle Eocene and Late Oligocene. Two main migration events during the Miocene are identified: dispersal into Madagascar around 17.0Ma (95% HPD: 22.3-12.3Ma); and dispersal into Asia between 21.4Ma (95% HPD: 26.7-16.7Ma) and 16.1Ma (95% HPD: 20.1-12.1Ma). Main conclusions Uvaria fruits are widely reported to be consumed by primates, and are therefore unlikely candidates for successful long-distance transoceanic dispersal. The other biogeographical hypotheses, involving rafting on the Indian tectonic plate, and dispersal via the European boreotropical forests associated with the Eocene thermal maximum, can be discounted due to incongruence with the divergence time estimates. An alternative scenario is suggested, involving dispersal across Arabia and central Asia via the tropical forests that developed during the late Middle Miocene thermal maximum (17-15Ma), associated with the 'out-of-Africa' dispersal of primates. The probable route and mechanism of overland dispersal between Africa and Asia for tropical plant groups during the Miocene climatic optimum are clarified based on the Uvaria data. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144731
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.997
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.807
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Research Grants CouncilHKU 7772/10M
Funding Information:

Financial support was provided by grant HKU 7772/10M (awarded to R.M.K.S.) from the Hong Kong Research Grants Council. We are grateful to: Lars Chatrou for unpublished sequences of several species; Jason Ali for discussions on the geological history of Africa and Madagascar; and Thomas Couvreur, Jim Doyle, Susanne Renner and an anonymous referee for their invaluable comments.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorSu, YCFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThomas, DCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, RMKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T06:20:12Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T06:20:12Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Biogeography, 2012, v. 39 n. 2, p. 322-335en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0305-0270en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144731-
dc.description.abstractAim African-Asian disjunctions are common in palaeotropical taxa, and are typically explained by reference to three competing hypotheses: (1) 'rafting' on the Indian tectonic plate, enabling Africa-to-Asia dispersal; (2) migration via Eocene boreotropical forests; and (3) transoceanic long-distance dispersal. These hypotheses are tested using Uvaria (Annonaceae), which is distributed in tropical regions of Africa, Asia and Australasia. Recent phylogenetic reconstructions of the genus show a clear correlation with geographical provenance, indicating a probable origin in Africa and subsequent dispersal to Asia and then Australasia. Ancestral areas and migration routes are inferred and compared with estimates of divergence times in order to distinguish between the prevailing dispersal hypotheses. Location Palaeotropics. Methods Divergence times in Uvaria are estimated by analysing the sequences of four DNA regions (matK, psbA-trnH spacer, rbcL and trnL-F) from 59 Uvaria species and 77 outgroup species, using a Bayesian uncorrelated lognormal (UCLD) relaxed molecular clock. The ancestral area of Uvaria and subsequent dispersal routes are inferred using statistical dispersal-vicariance analysis (s-diva). Results Uvaria is estimated to have originated in continental Africa 31.6Ma [95% highest posterior density (HPD): 38.4-25.1Ma] between the Middle Eocene and Late Oligocene. Two main migration events during the Miocene are identified: dispersal into Madagascar around 17.0Ma (95% HPD: 22.3-12.3Ma); and dispersal into Asia between 21.4Ma (95% HPD: 26.7-16.7Ma) and 16.1Ma (95% HPD: 20.1-12.1Ma). Main conclusions Uvaria fruits are widely reported to be consumed by primates, and are therefore unlikely candidates for successful long-distance transoceanic dispersal. The other biogeographical hypotheses, involving rafting on the Indian tectonic plate, and dispersal via the European boreotropical forests associated with the Eocene thermal maximum, can be discounted due to incongruence with the divergence time estimates. An alternative scenario is suggested, involving dispersal across Arabia and central Asia via the tropical forests that developed during the late Middle Miocene thermal maximum (17-15Ma), associated with the 'out-of-Africa' dispersal of primates. The probable route and mechanism of overland dispersal between Africa and Asia for tropical plant groups during the Miocene climatic optimum are clarified based on the Uvaria data. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JBIen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Biogeographyen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectAfrica-Asia disjunctionen_HK
dc.subjectAncestral areaen_HK
dc.subjectAngiospermsen_HK
dc.subjectAnnonaceaeen_HK
dc.subjectHistorical biogeographyen_HK
dc.subjectLong-distance dispersalen_HK
dc.subjectMigrationen_HK
dc.subjectTropical forestsen_HK
dc.title'Out-of-Africa' dispersal of tropical floras during the Miocene climatic optimum: Evidence from Uvaria (Annonaceae)en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSaunders, RMK: saunders@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySaunders, RMK=rp00774en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2699.2011.02598.xen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84855778726en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros198544en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84855778726&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume39en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage322en_HK
dc.identifier.epage335en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2699-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000299042000008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, L=37036565600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSu, YCF=7404456219en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, DC=25628765500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSaunders, RMK=35345489600en_HK

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