File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Climatic forcing of Quaternary deep-sea benthic communities in the North Pacific Ocean

TitleClimatic forcing of Quaternary deep-sea benthic communities in the North Pacific Ocean
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherPaleontological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.paleosoc.org/paleobio.htm
Citation
Paleobiology, 2012, v. 38 n. 1, p. 162-179 How to Cite?
AbstractThere is growing evidence that changes in deep-sea benthic ecosystems are modulated by climate changes, but most evidence to date comes from the North Atlantic Ocean. Here we analyze new ostracod and published foraminiferal records for the last 250,000 years on Shatsky Rise in the North Pacific Ocean. Using linear models, we evaluate statistically the ability of environmental drivers (temperature, productivity, and seasonality of productivity) to predict changes in faunal diversity, abundance, and composition. These microfossil data show glacial-interglacial shifts in overall abundances and species diversities that are low during glacial intervals and high during interglacials. These patterns replicate those previously documented in the North Atlantic Ocean, suggesting that the climatic forcing of the deep-sea ecosystem is widespread, and possibly global in nature. However, these results also reveal differences with prior studies that probably reflect the isolated nature of Shatsky Rise as a remote oceanic plateau. Ostracod assemblages on Shatsky Rise are highly endemic but of low diversity, consistent with the limited dispersal potential of these animals. Benthic foraminifera, by contrast, have much greater dispersal ability and their assemblages at Shatsky Rise show diversities typical for deep-sea faunas in other regions. Statistical analyses also reveal ostracod-foraminferal differences in relationships between environmental drivers and biotic change. Rarefied diversity is best explained as a hump-shaped function of surface productivity in ostracods, but as having a weak and positive relationship with temperature in foraminifera. Abundance shows a positive relationship with both productivity and seasonality of productivity in foraminifera, and a hump-shaped relationship with productivity in ostracods. Finally, species composition in ostracods is influenced by both temperature and productivity, but only a temperature effect is evident in foraminifera. Though complex in detail, the global-scale link between deep-sea ecosystems and Quaternary climate changes underscores the importance of the interaction between the physical and biological components of paleoceanographical research for better understanding the history of the biosphere. © 2012 The Paleontological Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144729
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.959
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.997
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYasuhara, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorHunt, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCronin, TMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHokanishi, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKawahata, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTsujimoto, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorIshitake, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T06:20:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T06:20:11Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPaleobiology, 2012, v. 38 n. 1, p. 162-179en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0094-8373en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144729-
dc.description.abstractThere is growing evidence that changes in deep-sea benthic ecosystems are modulated by climate changes, but most evidence to date comes from the North Atlantic Ocean. Here we analyze new ostracod and published foraminiferal records for the last 250,000 years on Shatsky Rise in the North Pacific Ocean. Using linear models, we evaluate statistically the ability of environmental drivers (temperature, productivity, and seasonality of productivity) to predict changes in faunal diversity, abundance, and composition. These microfossil data show glacial-interglacial shifts in overall abundances and species diversities that are low during glacial intervals and high during interglacials. These patterns replicate those previously documented in the North Atlantic Ocean, suggesting that the climatic forcing of the deep-sea ecosystem is widespread, and possibly global in nature. However, these results also reveal differences with prior studies that probably reflect the isolated nature of Shatsky Rise as a remote oceanic plateau. Ostracod assemblages on Shatsky Rise are highly endemic but of low diversity, consistent with the limited dispersal potential of these animals. Benthic foraminifera, by contrast, have much greater dispersal ability and their assemblages at Shatsky Rise show diversities typical for deep-sea faunas in other regions. Statistical analyses also reveal ostracod-foraminferal differences in relationships between environmental drivers and biotic change. Rarefied diversity is best explained as a hump-shaped function of surface productivity in ostracods, but as having a weak and positive relationship with temperature in foraminifera. Abundance shows a positive relationship with both productivity and seasonality of productivity in foraminifera, and a hump-shaped relationship with productivity in ostracods. Finally, species composition in ostracods is influenced by both temperature and productivity, but only a temperature effect is evident in foraminifera. Though complex in detail, the global-scale link between deep-sea ecosystems and Quaternary climate changes underscores the importance of the interaction between the physical and biological components of paleoceanographical research for better understanding the history of the biosphere. © 2012 The Paleontological Society.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPaleontological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.paleosoc.org/paleobio.htm-
dc.relation.ispartofPaleobiologyen_HK
dc.titleClimatic forcing of Quaternary deep-sea benthic communities in the North Pacific Oceanen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYasuhara, M: yasuhara@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYasuhara, M=rp01474en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1666/10068.1en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84855499678en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros198487en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84855499678&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume38en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage162en_HK
dc.identifier.epage179en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000299063400010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYasuhara, M=7102069020en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHunt, G=8502893500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCronin, TM=7102710042en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHokanishi, N=13007676000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKawahata, H=26643484600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsujimoto, A=14326222600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIshitake, M=6505571782en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats