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Article: Acrolein scavengers: Reactivity, mechanism and impact on health
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TitleAcrolein scavengers: Reactivity, mechanism and impact on health
 
AuthorsZhu, Q1
Sun, Z1
Jiang, Y2
Chen, F1 3
Wang, M1
 
KeywordsAcrolein
Antioxidants
Lipid peroxidation
Scavengers
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherWiley - V C H Verlag GmbH & Co KGaA.
 
CitationMolecular Nutrition And Food Research, 2011, v. 55 n. 9, p. 1375-1390 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mnfr.201100149
 
AbstractAcrolein (ACR) is an α,β-unsaturated aldehyde that exists extensively in the environment and (thermally processed) foods. It can also be generated through endogenous metabolism. Its high electrophilicity makes this aldehyde notorious for its facile reaction with biological nucleophiles, leading to the modification of proteins/DNA and depletion of glutathione. Recent studies also have revealed its roles in disturbing various cell signing pathways in biological systems. With growing evidences of ACR's implication in human diseases, strategies to eliminate its hazardous impacts are of great importance. One of the intervention strategies is the application of reactive scavengers to directly trap ACR. Some known ACR scavengers include sulfur (thiol)-containing and nitrogen (amino)-containing compounds as well as the newly emerging natural polyphenols. In this review, the interactions between ACR and its scavengers are highlighted. The discussion about ACR scavengers is mainly focused on their chemical reactivity, trapping mechanisms as well as their roles extended to biological relevance. In addition to their direct trapping effect on ACR, these scavengers might possess multiple functions and offer additional benefits against ACR-induced toxicity. A comprehensive understanding of the mechanism involved may help to establish ACR scavenging as a novel therapeutic intervention against human diseases that are associated with ACR and/or oxidative stress. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
 
ISSN1613-4125
2013 Impact Factor: 4.909
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mnfr.201100149
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000295692800009
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Q
 
dc.contributor.authorSun, Z
 
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, F
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, M
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T06:20:08Z
 
dc.date.available2012-02-03T06:20:08Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractAcrolein (ACR) is an α,β-unsaturated aldehyde that exists extensively in the environment and (thermally processed) foods. It can also be generated through endogenous metabolism. Its high electrophilicity makes this aldehyde notorious for its facile reaction with biological nucleophiles, leading to the modification of proteins/DNA and depletion of glutathione. Recent studies also have revealed its roles in disturbing various cell signing pathways in biological systems. With growing evidences of ACR's implication in human diseases, strategies to eliminate its hazardous impacts are of great importance. One of the intervention strategies is the application of reactive scavengers to directly trap ACR. Some known ACR scavengers include sulfur (thiol)-containing and nitrogen (amino)-containing compounds as well as the newly emerging natural polyphenols. In this review, the interactions between ACR and its scavengers are highlighted. The discussion about ACR scavengers is mainly focused on their chemical reactivity, trapping mechanisms as well as their roles extended to biological relevance. In addition to their direct trapping effect on ACR, these scavengers might possess multiple functions and offer additional benefits against ACR-induced toxicity. A comprehensive understanding of the mechanism involved may help to establish ACR scavenging as a novel therapeutic intervention against human diseases that are associated with ACR and/or oxidative stress. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationMolecular Nutrition And Food Research, 2011, v. 55 n. 9, p. 1375-1390 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mnfr.201100149
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mnfr.201100149
 
dc.identifier.epage1390
 
dc.identifier.hkuros198289
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295692800009
 
dc.identifier.issn1613-4125
2013 Impact Factor: 4.909
 
dc.identifier.issue9
 
dc.identifier.pmid21714129
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052525395
 
dc.identifier.spage1375
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144726
 
dc.identifier.volume55
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherWiley - V C H Verlag GmbH & Co KGaA.
 
dc.publisher.placeGermany
 
dc.relation.ispartofMolecular Nutrition and Food Research
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsPreprint This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: FULL CITE, which has been published in final form at [Link to final article].
 
dc.subject.meshAcrolein - chemistry - toxicity
 
dc.subject.meshAscorbic Acid - chemistry - pharmacology
 
dc.subject.meshGlutathione - metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshHydralazine - chemistry - pharmacology
 
dc.subject.meshPharmaceutical Preparations - chemistry
 
dc.subjectAcrolein
 
dc.subjectAntioxidants
 
dc.subjectLipid peroxidation
 
dc.subjectScavengers
 
dc.titleAcrolein scavengers: Reactivity, mechanism and impact on health
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Sun, Z</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Hong Kong Baptist University
  3. Peking University