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Article: Age effects shrink when motor learning is predominantly supported by nondeclarative, automatic memory processes: Evidence from golf putting

TitleAge effects shrink when motor learning is predominantly supported by nondeclarative, automatic memory processes: Evidence from golf putting
Authors
KeywordsAttention
Cognitive ageing
Frequency of errors
Memory
Motor learning
Issue Date2012
PublisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/17470218.asp
Citation
Quarterly Journal Of Experimental Psychology, 2012, v. 65 n. 1, p. 25-38 How to Cite?
AbstractCan motor learning be equivalent in younger and older adults? To address this question, 48 younger (M = 23.5 years) and 48 older (M = 65.0 years) participants learned to perform a golf-putting task in two different motor learning situations: one that resulted in infrequent errors or one that resulted in frequent errors. The results demonstrated that infrequent-error learning predominantly relied on nondeclarative, automatic memory processes whereas frequent-error learning predominantly relied on declarative, effortful memory processes: After learning, infrequent-error learners verbalized fewer strategies than frequent-error learners; at transfer, a concurrent, attention-demanding secondary task (tone counting) left motor performance of infrequent-error learners unaffected but impaired that of frequent-error learners. The results showed age-equivalent motor performance in infrequent-error learning but age deficits in frequent-error learning. Motor performance of frequent-error learners required more attention with age, as evidenced by an age deficit on the attention-demanding secondary task. The disappearance of age effects when nondeclarative, automatic memory processes predominated suggests that these processes are preserved with age and are available even early in motor learning. © 2012 Copyright The Experimental Psychology Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144626
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.13
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.392
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Ministere de l'Enseignement Superieur et de la Recherche
Fonds de la Recherche en Sante du Quebec (FRSQ)
Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative regionHKU 748709H
Funding Information:

Jon Maxwell passed away on Sunday 25th January 2009. We were privileged to have the opportunity to work with Jonny Max. This research was supported by a doctoral fellowship from the Ministere de l'Enseignement Superieur et de la Recherche to Guillaume Chauvel. Sven Joubert is supported by a Chercheur Boursier award from the Fonds de la Recherche en Sante du Quebec (FRSQ). Rich S. W. Masters is supported by the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative region (HKU 748709H). We thank Eric Ruthruff for his commentary and invaluable insights on an earlier draft of the manuscript.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChauvel, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMaquestiaux, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHartley, AAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJoubert, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDidierjean, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T06:16:49Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T06:16:49Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationQuarterly Journal Of Experimental Psychology, 2012, v. 65 n. 1, p. 25-38en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1747-0218en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144626-
dc.description.abstractCan motor learning be equivalent in younger and older adults? To address this question, 48 younger (M = 23.5 years) and 48 older (M = 65.0 years) participants learned to perform a golf-putting task in two different motor learning situations: one that resulted in infrequent errors or one that resulted in frequent errors. The results demonstrated that infrequent-error learning predominantly relied on nondeclarative, automatic memory processes whereas frequent-error learning predominantly relied on declarative, effortful memory processes: After learning, infrequent-error learners verbalized fewer strategies than frequent-error learners; at transfer, a concurrent, attention-demanding secondary task (tone counting) left motor performance of infrequent-error learners unaffected but impaired that of frequent-error learners. The results showed age-equivalent motor performance in infrequent-error learning but age deficits in frequent-error learning. Motor performance of frequent-error learners required more attention with age, as evidenced by an age deficit on the attention-demanding secondary task. The disappearance of age effects when nondeclarative, automatic memory processes predominated suggests that these processes are preserved with age and are available even early in motor learning. © 2012 Copyright The Experimental Psychology Society.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/17470218.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofQuarterly Journal of Experimental Psychologyen_HK
dc.subjectAttentionen_HK
dc.subjectCognitive ageingen_HK
dc.subjectFrequency of errorsen_HK
dc.subjectMemoryen_HK
dc.subjectMotor learningen_HK
dc.titleAge effects shrink when motor learning is predominantly supported by nondeclarative, automatic memory processes: Evidence from golf puttingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMasters, RSW: mastersr@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, RSW=rp00935en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17470218.2011.588714en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21736434-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84859340687en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros198545en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84859340687&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume65en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage25en_HK
dc.identifier.epage38en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1747-0226-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000302545500003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.relation.projectDEVELOPMENT OF A CHINESE VERSION OF THE MOVEMENT SPECIFIC REINVESTMENT SCALE TO ASSESS THE PROPENSITY FOR CONSCIOUS MOTOR PROCESSING IN ELDERLY PEOPLE AT RISK OF FALLING IN HONG KONG.-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChauvel, G=55170156900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMaquestiaux, F=21834017800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHartley, AA=55172867400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJoubert, S=55170261400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDidierjean, A=6602155211en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMasters, RSW=7102880488en_HK

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