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Article: A cluster-randomized controlled trial to reduce sedentary behavior and promote physical activity and health of 8-9 year olds: The Transform-Us! Study

TitleA cluster-randomized controlled trial to reduce sedentary behavior and promote physical activity and health of 8-9 year olds: The Transform-Us! Study
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/
Citation
Bmc Public Health, 2011, v. 11 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Physical activity (PA) is associated with positive cardio-metabolic health and emerging evidence suggests sedentary behavior (SB) may be detrimental to children's health independent of PA. The primary aim of the Transform-Us! study is to determine whether an 18-month, behavioral and environmental intervention in the school and family settings results in higher levels of PA and lower rates of SB among 8-9 year old children compared with usual practice (post-intervention and 12-months follow-up). The secondary aims are to determine the independent and combined effects of PA and SB on children's cardio-metabolic health risk factors; identify the factors that mediate the success of the intervention; and determine whether the intervention is cost-effective. Methods/design. A four-arm cluster-randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a 2 × 2 factorial design, with schools as the unit of randomization. Twenty schools will be allocated to one of four intervention groups, sedentary behavior (SB-I), physical activity (PA-I), combined SB and PA (SB+PA-I) or current practice control (C), which will be evaluated among approximately 600 children aged 8-9 years in school year 3 living in Melbourne, Australia. All children in year 3 at intervention schools in 2010 (8-9 years) will receive the intervention over an 18-month period with a maintenance 'booster' delivered in 2012 and children at all schools will be invited to participate in the evaluation assessments. To maximize the sample and to capture new students arriving at intervention and control schools, recruitment will be on-going up to the post-intervention time point. Primary outcomes are time spent sitting and in PA assessed via accelerometers and inclinometers and survey. Discussion. To our knowledge, Transform-Us! is the first RCT to examine the effectiveness of intervention strategies for reducing children's overall sedentary time, promoting PA and optimizing health outcomes. The integration of consistent strategies and messages to children from teachers and parents in both school and family settings is a critical component of this study, and if shown to be effective, may have a significant impact on educational policies as well as on pedagogical and parenting practices. © 2011Salmon et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144623
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.209
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.372
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)ID533815
ID425849
ID479513
Diabetes Australia Research Trust (DART)
National Heart Foundation of Australia (NHFA)
Australian Research Council
Victorian Health Promotion Foundation
Funding Information:

This study is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Project Grant (2009-2013; ID533815) and a Diabetes Australia Research Trust (DART) grant. The funding bodies played no role in the study design; data collection, analysis, and interpretation; in the writing of the manuscript; or in the decision to submit the manuscript for publication. JS and KH are supported by National Heart Foundation of Australia (NHFA) Career Development Awards; CH is supported by a NHFA Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship; RD is supported by a NHMRC Career Development Award (ID425849); DD is supported by an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship; KB is supported by a NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship (ID479513); DC is supported by a Victorian Health Promotion Foundation Senior Research Fellowship; and SB is supported by a NHFA Post-Graduate Scholarship.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSalmon, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorArundell, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorHume, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHesketh, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorDunstan, DWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDaly, RMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPearson, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorMoodie, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorSheppard, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorBall, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorBagley, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPaw, MCAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCrawford, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T06:16:47Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T06:16:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBmc Public Health, 2011, v. 11en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144623-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Physical activity (PA) is associated with positive cardio-metabolic health and emerging evidence suggests sedentary behavior (SB) may be detrimental to children's health independent of PA. The primary aim of the Transform-Us! study is to determine whether an 18-month, behavioral and environmental intervention in the school and family settings results in higher levels of PA and lower rates of SB among 8-9 year old children compared with usual practice (post-intervention and 12-months follow-up). The secondary aims are to determine the independent and combined effects of PA and SB on children's cardio-metabolic health risk factors; identify the factors that mediate the success of the intervention; and determine whether the intervention is cost-effective. Methods/design. A four-arm cluster-randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a 2 × 2 factorial design, with schools as the unit of randomization. Twenty schools will be allocated to one of four intervention groups, sedentary behavior (SB-I), physical activity (PA-I), combined SB and PA (SB+PA-I) or current practice control (C), which will be evaluated among approximately 600 children aged 8-9 years in school year 3 living in Melbourne, Australia. All children in year 3 at intervention schools in 2010 (8-9 years) will receive the intervention over an 18-month period with a maintenance 'booster' delivered in 2012 and children at all schools will be invited to participate in the evaluation assessments. To maximize the sample and to capture new students arriving at intervention and control schools, recruitment will be on-going up to the post-intervention time point. Primary outcomes are time spent sitting and in PA assessed via accelerometers and inclinometers and survey. Discussion. To our knowledge, Transform-Us! is the first RCT to examine the effectiveness of intervention strategies for reducing children's overall sedentary time, promoting PA and optimizing health outcomes. The integration of consistent strategies and messages to children from teachers and parents in both school and family settings is a critical component of this study, and if shown to be effective, may have a significant impact on educational policies as well as on pedagogical and parenting practices. © 2011Salmon et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Public Healthen_HK
dc.rightsBMC Public Health. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Index-
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshExercise - physiology-
dc.subject.meshHealth Promotion - methods-
dc.subject.meshSedentary Lifestyle-
dc.titleA cluster-randomized controlled trial to reduce sedentary behavior and promote physical activity and health of 8-9 year olds: The Transform-Us! Studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2458-11-759en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21970511-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3213038-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80053541511en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros198379en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80053541511&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume11en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000296793500001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSalmon, J=7201427314en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridArundell, L=35486518400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHume, C=8267495400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBrown, H=26631686700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHesketh, K=7003707468en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDunstan, DW=7102907266en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDaly, RM=7103342079en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPearson, N=25028567400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCerin, E=14522064200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMoodie, M=15521407900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSheppard, L=36139888100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBall, K=7101771723en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBagley, S=13409086100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPaw, MCA=8688815900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCrawford, D=7403085727en_HK

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