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Article: Mechanisms linking affective reactions to competition-related and competition-extraneous concerns in male martial artists

TitleMechanisms linking affective reactions to competition-related and competition-extraneous concerns in male martial artists
Authors
KeywordsEmotions
ESM
Martial arts
Issue Date2011
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/SMS
Citation
Scandinavian Journal Of Medicine And Science In Sports, 2011, v. 21 n. 5, p. 700-712 How to Cite?
AbstractThe main aim of this study was to examine affective linkages between competition-related and competition-extraneous concern domains. A secondary purpose was to establish the contributions of pre-competition affects to post-competition performance appraisals, independent of pre-competition performance expectations. Thirty-nine highly skilled male martial artists were assessed at five random times a day for a week and 1h before a major competition on affective states and sources of concern. They also reported their performance expectations and post-competition performance appraisals. Affective states triggered by competition-related and competition-extraneous concerns persisted in time. Carry-over effects were stronger after reports of competition-related concerns, emphasizing the subjective importance of the competitive event. Although positive (enjoyment and surprise) and negative (sadness and guilt) affective spill-over was observed from competition-extraneous to competition-related concerns, the reverse held true only for disgust. These findings may be due to the athletes' ability to regulate affective reactions within a sporting setting, in particular. Spill-over from competition-extraneous to competition-related concerns is indicative of a lesser degree of control over work/study and family life. Given that average weekly negative affects and anger/disgust were independent predictors of post-competition performance appraisals, the phenomenon of spill-over and other affective linkage mechanisms in sport warrant further investigation. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144622
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.025
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.192
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorBarnett, Aen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T06:16:46Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T06:16:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationScandinavian Journal Of Medicine And Science In Sports, 2011, v. 21 n. 5, p. 700-712en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0905-7188en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144622-
dc.description.abstractThe main aim of this study was to examine affective linkages between competition-related and competition-extraneous concern domains. A secondary purpose was to establish the contributions of pre-competition affects to post-competition performance appraisals, independent of pre-competition performance expectations. Thirty-nine highly skilled male martial artists were assessed at five random times a day for a week and 1h before a major competition on affective states and sources of concern. They also reported their performance expectations and post-competition performance appraisals. Affective states triggered by competition-related and competition-extraneous concerns persisted in time. Carry-over effects were stronger after reports of competition-related concerns, emphasizing the subjective importance of the competitive event. Although positive (enjoyment and surprise) and negative (sadness and guilt) affective spill-over was observed from competition-extraneous to competition-related concerns, the reverse held true only for disgust. These findings may be due to the athletes' ability to regulate affective reactions within a sporting setting, in particular. Spill-over from competition-extraneous to competition-related concerns is indicative of a lesser degree of control over work/study and family life. Given that average weekly negative affects and anger/disgust were independent predictors of post-competition performance appraisals, the phenomenon of spill-over and other affective linkage mechanisms in sport warrant further investigation. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/SMSen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofScandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sportsen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectEmotionsen_HK
dc.subjectESMen_HK
dc.subjectMartial artsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAthletic Performance - psychology-
dc.subject.meshCompetitive Behavior-
dc.subject.meshEmotions-
dc.subject.meshMartial Arts - psychology-
dc.subject.meshSocial Participation - psychology-
dc.titleMechanisms linking affective reactions to competition-related and competition-extraneous concerns in male martial artistsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0838.2009.01072.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21917020-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3197377-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052898012en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros198378en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80052898012&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume21en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage700en_HK
dc.identifier.epage712en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295082200011-
dc.publisher.placeDenmarken_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCerin, E=14522064200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBarnett, A=35195335800en_HK

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