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Article: Infant growth and onset of puberty: Prospective observations from Hong Kong's "Children of 1997" birth cohort

TitleInfant growth and onset of puberty: Prospective observations from Hong Kong's "Children of 1997" birth cohort
Authors
KeywordsBody Mass Index
Chinese
Infant Growth Trajectory
Puberty Onset
Sex
Issue Date2012
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/annepidem
Citation
Annals Of Epidemiology, 2012, v. 22 n. 1, p. 43-50 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: Infant growth and early puberty are associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease. It is unclear whether pubertal timing has an independent etiologic role or is a marker of preceding growth. We examined whether infant growth was associated with age at pubertal onset and whether any associations were mediated by childhood height or body mass index. Methods: We used multivariable interval-censored proportional hazards regression in 6873 term births (87% follow-up, 53% male) from a population-representative Hong Kong Chinese birth cohort, " Children of 1997." We examined the adjusted associations of sex-specific infant growth trajectories, derived from latent class analyses by the use of, on average, 4.2 measurements per child, with clinically assessed age at pubertal onset (Tanner stage II). We used Sobel tests to assess mediation. Results: Compared with children of average birth weight whose weight followed the same centile curve, a faster weight growth trajectory from birth to 12 months was associated with earlier pubertal onset (time ratio, 0.979; 95% confidence interval, 0.965-0.993) among boys, whereas girls born light with slow infant growth had later puberty (time ratio 1.020, 95% confidence interval 1.006-1.034). These associations were mediated by both height and body mass index among girls but only by height in boys. Conclusions: Infant weight growth may be associated with earlier pubertal onset, particularly in boys, at least in part because it is associated with more linear growth in childhood. Earlier pubertal onset may be an indicator of up-regulation of growth axes related to the risk of cardiovascular disease. © 2012 Elsevier Inc..
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144608
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.335
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.439
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Health and Welfare Bureau, Government of Hong Kong216106
Health and Health Services Research Fund [HHSRF]03040771
07080751
Funding Information:

This work is a substudy of the "Children of 1997" birth cohort, which was initially supported by the Health Care and Promotion Fund, Health and Welfare Bureau, Government of Hong Kong [HCPF Grant # 216106] and re-established in 2005 funded by the Health and Health Services Research Fund [HHSRF Grants #03040771]. This sub-study was funded by the Health and Health Services Research Fund [HHSRF Grants #07080751].

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHui, LLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, MYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T06:15:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T06:15:43Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAnnals Of Epidemiology, 2012, v. 22 n. 1, p. 43-50en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1047-2797en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144608-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Infant growth and early puberty are associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease. It is unclear whether pubertal timing has an independent etiologic role or is a marker of preceding growth. We examined whether infant growth was associated with age at pubertal onset and whether any associations were mediated by childhood height or body mass index. Methods: We used multivariable interval-censored proportional hazards regression in 6873 term births (87% follow-up, 53% male) from a population-representative Hong Kong Chinese birth cohort, " Children of 1997." We examined the adjusted associations of sex-specific infant growth trajectories, derived from latent class analyses by the use of, on average, 4.2 measurements per child, with clinically assessed age at pubertal onset (Tanner stage II). We used Sobel tests to assess mediation. Results: Compared with children of average birth weight whose weight followed the same centile curve, a faster weight growth trajectory from birth to 12 months was associated with earlier pubertal onset (time ratio, 0.979; 95% confidence interval, 0.965-0.993) among boys, whereas girls born light with slow infant growth had later puberty (time ratio 1.020, 95% confidence interval 1.006-1.034). These associations were mediated by both height and body mass index among girls but only by height in boys. Conclusions: Infant weight growth may be associated with earlier pubertal onset, particularly in boys, at least in part because it is associated with more linear growth in childhood. Earlier pubertal onset may be an indicator of up-regulation of growth axes related to the risk of cardiovascular disease. © 2012 Elsevier Inc..en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/annepidemen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subjectBody Mass Indexen_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectInfant Growth Trajectoryen_HK
dc.subjectPuberty Onseten_HK
dc.subjectSexen_HK
dc.titleInfant growth and onset of puberty: Prospective observations from Hong Kong's "Children of 1997" birth cohorten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHui, LL: huic@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHui, LL=rp01698en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.annepidem.2011.10.003en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22056481-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-83055180640en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros198159en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-83055180640&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume22en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage43en_HK
dc.identifier.epage50en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000298221100006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.relation.projectShort- and medium-term outcomes of accelerated infant growth in Hong Kong Chinese birth cohort-
dc.relation.projectDoes infant or childhood obesity lead to adolescent depression?-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, LL=12774460100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, MY=24469381500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike10008298-

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