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Conference Paper: Climate Governance in China: Using the "Iron Hand"

TitleClimate Governance in China: Using the "Iron Hand"
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherEdward Elgar Publishing
Citation
International Workshop on Climate Change and Local Government Law, Vancouver, Canada, 22-23 October 2011. In Benjamin J. Richardson (Ed.), Local Climate Change Law: Environmental Regulation in Cities and Other Localities. Cheltenham, U.K. ; Northampton, Mass.: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2012, p. 300-324 How to Cite?
AbstractThis chapter analyses the Chinese climate governance landscape that has emerged over the past decade, and focuses on the role of local governments. The central argument is that climate governance in China is predominantly top-down and highly bureaucratic in nature. Local initiatives to address climate change have tended to be responses to policy directions and performance targets imposed from the central government in Beijing. However, there is an interesting transnational dynamic to local climate governance in China as many local governments have embraced the financial opportunities afforded by the Kyoto Protocol’s Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). Alongside environmental aid projects funded by multilateral agencies and private foundations, there is considerable climate mitigation activity at the local level because of the CDM.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144482
ISBN
SSRN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLin, JSW-
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-30T06:34:56Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-30T06:34:56Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Workshop on Climate Change and Local Government Law, Vancouver, Canada, 22-23 October 2011. In Benjamin J. Richardson (Ed.), Local Climate Change Law: Environmental Regulation in Cities and Other Localities. Cheltenham, U.K. ; Northampton, Mass.: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2012, p. 300-324-
dc.identifier.isbn9780857937476-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144482-
dc.description.abstractThis chapter analyses the Chinese climate governance landscape that has emerged over the past decade, and focuses on the role of local governments. The central argument is that climate governance in China is predominantly top-down and highly bureaucratic in nature. Local initiatives to address climate change have tended to be responses to policy directions and performance targets imposed from the central government in Beijing. However, there is an interesting transnational dynamic to local climate governance in China as many local governments have embraced the financial opportunities afforded by the Kyoto Protocol’s Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). Alongside environmental aid projects funded by multilateral agencies and private foundations, there is considerable climate mitigation activity at the local level because of the CDM.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherEdward Elgar Publishing-
dc.relation.ispartofLocal Climate Change Law: Environmental Regulation in Cities and Other Localities-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleClimate Governance in China: Using the "Iron Hand"en_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLin, JSW: jolene@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros220909-
dc.identifier.hkuros201075-
dc.publisher.placeCheltenham, U.K. ; Northampton, Mass.-
dc.identifier.ssrn1967830-
dc.description.otherInternational Workshop on Climate Change and Local Government Law, Vancouver, Canada, 22-23 October 2011. In Benjamin J. Richardson (Ed.), Local Climate Change Law: Environmental Regulation in Cities and Other Localities. Cheltenham, U.K. ; Northampton, Mass.: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2012, p. 300-324-
dc.identifier.hkulrp2012/007-

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