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Article: Asian medical students: Quality of life and motivation to learn
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TitleAsian medical students: Quality of life and motivation to learn
 
AuthorsHenning, MA2
Hawken, SJ1
Krägeloh, C3
Zhao, Y2
Doherty, I2
 
KeywordsAsian
Medical students
Motivation to learn
Quality of life
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherSpringer Netherlands. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/education/journal/12564
 
CitationAsia Pacific Education Review, 2011, v. 12 n. 3, p. 437-445 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12564-011-9148-y
 
AbstractIssues linked with the notions of quality of life (QOL) and motivation to learn among Asian medical students have not been well documented. This is true in both the international and the New Zealand contexts. Our paper addresses this lack of research by focusing on the QOL of international and domestic Asian students studying in New Zealand, where Asian students form a significant proportion of tertiary students. Although there is evidence to suggest that Asian students do well academically, it was felt that an investigation into their QOL would be instructive as QOL will likely have an impact on cognition, behavior, general well-being, and motivation. The present study surveyed fourth- and fifth-year medical students to examine the relationship between QOL and motivation to learn and to consider how Asian medical students compare against European medical and non-medical student peers. The study utilized the World Health Organization-Quality of Life questionnaire (BREF version) and a shortened version of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. The results show that the Asian medical students in this study generated significantly lower scores in terms of their satisfaction with social relationships compared with their non-Asian peers. In addition, international Asian medical students appear to be more at risk than domestic Asian students with respect to test anxiety. The paper considers the findings and the implications for quality of life, motivation to learn, medical education, and the Asian student community. © 2011 Education Research Institute.
 
ISSN1598-1037
2012 Impact Factor: 0.5
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.483
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12564-011-9148-y
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000293637000011
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorHenning, MA
 
dc.contributor.authorHawken, SJ
 
dc.contributor.authorKrägeloh, C
 
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorDoherty, I
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-20T09:02:22Z
 
dc.date.available2012-01-20T09:02:22Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractIssues linked with the notions of quality of life (QOL) and motivation to learn among Asian medical students have not been well documented. This is true in both the international and the New Zealand contexts. Our paper addresses this lack of research by focusing on the QOL of international and domestic Asian students studying in New Zealand, where Asian students form a significant proportion of tertiary students. Although there is evidence to suggest that Asian students do well academically, it was felt that an investigation into their QOL would be instructive as QOL will likely have an impact on cognition, behavior, general well-being, and motivation. The present study surveyed fourth- and fifth-year medical students to examine the relationship between QOL and motivation to learn and to consider how Asian medical students compare against European medical and non-medical student peers. The study utilized the World Health Organization-Quality of Life questionnaire (BREF version) and a shortened version of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. The results show that the Asian medical students in this study generated significantly lower scores in terms of their satisfaction with social relationships compared with their non-Asian peers. In addition, international Asian medical students appear to be more at risk than domestic Asian students with respect to test anxiety. The paper considers the findings and the implications for quality of life, motivation to learn, medical education, and the Asian student community. © 2011 Education Research Institute.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAsia Pacific Education Review, 2011, v. 12 n. 3, p. 437-445 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12564-011-9148-y
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12564-011-9148-y
 
dc.identifier.epage445
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000293637000011
 
dc.identifier.issn1598-1037
2012 Impact Factor: 0.5
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.483
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79961171670
 
dc.identifier.spage437
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144471
 
dc.identifier.volume12
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherSpringer Netherlands. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/education/journal/12564
 
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
 
dc.relation.ispartofAsia Pacific Education Review
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectAsian
 
dc.subjectMedical students
 
dc.subjectMotivation to learn
 
dc.subjectQuality of life
 
dc.titleAsian medical students: Quality of life and motivation to learn
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Doherty, I</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>Issues linked with the notions of quality of life (QOL) and motivation to learn among Asian medical students have not been well documented. This is true in both the international and the New Zealand contexts. Our paper addresses this lack of research by focusing on the QOL of international and domestic Asian students studying in New Zealand, where Asian students form a significant proportion of tertiary students. Although there is evidence to suggest that Asian students do well academically, it was felt that an investigation into their QOL would be instructive as QOL will likely have an impact on cognition, behavior, general well-being, and motivation. The present study surveyed fourth- and fifth-year medical students to examine the relationship between QOL and motivation to learn and to consider how Asian medical students compare against European medical and non-medical student peers. The study utilized the World Health Organization-Quality of Life questionnaire (BREF version) and a shortened version of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. The results show that the Asian medical students in this study generated significantly lower scores in terms of their satisfaction with social relationships compared with their non-Asian peers. In addition, international Asian medical students appear to be more at risk than domestic Asian students with respect to test anxiety. The paper considers the findings and the implications for quality of life, motivation to learn, medical education, and the Asian student community. &#169; 2011 Education Research Institute.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland
  2. University of Auckland
  3. Auckland University of Technology