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Article: Low-fat mozzarella as influenced by microbial exopolysaccharides, preacidification, and whey protein concentrate

TitleLow-fat mozzarella as influenced by microbial exopolysaccharides, preacidification, and whey protein concentrate
Authors
KeywordsCoculture
Exopolysaccharide
Preacidification
Whey protein concentrate
Issue Date2005
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalofdairyscience.org/
Citation
Journal Of Dairy Science, 2005, v. 88 n. 6, p. 1973-1985 How to Cite?
AbstractLow-fat Mozzarella cheeses containing 6% fat were made by preacidification of milk, preacidification combined with exopolysaccharide- (EPS-) producing starter, used independently or as a coculture with non-EPS starter, and preacidification combined with whey protein concentrate (WPC) and EPS. The impact of these treatments on moisture retention, changes in texture profile analysis, cheese melt, stretch, and on pizza bake performance were investigated over 45 d of storage at 4°C. Preacidified cheeses without EPS (control) had the lowest moisture content (53.75%). These cheeses were hardest and exhibited greatest springiness and chewiness. The meltability and stretchability of these cheeses increased most during the first 28 d of storage. The moisture content in cheeses increased to 55.08, 54.79, and 55.82% with EPS starter (containing 41.18 mg/g of EPS), coculturing (containing 28.61 mg/g of EPS), and WPC (containing 44.23 mg/g of EPS), respectively. Exopolysaccharide reduced hardness, springiness, and chewiness of low-fat cheeses made with preacidified milk in general and such cheeses exhibited an increase in cohesiveness and meltability. Although stretch distance was similar in all cheeses, those containing EPS were softer than the control. Cocultured cheeses exhibited the greatest meltability. Cheeses containing WPC were softest in general; however, hardness remained unchanged over 45 d. Cheeses made with WPC had the least increase in meltability over time. Incorporation of WPC did not reduce surface scorching or increase shred fusion of cheese shreds during pizza baking; however, there was an improvement in these properties between d 7 and 45. Coating of the cheese shreds with oil was necessary for adequate browning, melt, and flow characteristics in all cheese types. © American Dairy Science Association, 2005.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144447
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.408
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.401
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZisu, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorShah, NPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-20T09:02:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-20T09:02:07Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Dairy Science, 2005, v. 88 n. 6, p. 1973-1985en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-0302en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144447-
dc.description.abstractLow-fat Mozzarella cheeses containing 6% fat were made by preacidification of milk, preacidification combined with exopolysaccharide- (EPS-) producing starter, used independently or as a coculture with non-EPS starter, and preacidification combined with whey protein concentrate (WPC) and EPS. The impact of these treatments on moisture retention, changes in texture profile analysis, cheese melt, stretch, and on pizza bake performance were investigated over 45 d of storage at 4°C. Preacidified cheeses without EPS (control) had the lowest moisture content (53.75%). These cheeses were hardest and exhibited greatest springiness and chewiness. The meltability and stretchability of these cheeses increased most during the first 28 d of storage. The moisture content in cheeses increased to 55.08, 54.79, and 55.82% with EPS starter (containing 41.18 mg/g of EPS), coculturing (containing 28.61 mg/g of EPS), and WPC (containing 44.23 mg/g of EPS), respectively. Exopolysaccharide reduced hardness, springiness, and chewiness of low-fat cheeses made with preacidified milk in general and such cheeses exhibited an increase in cohesiveness and meltability. Although stretch distance was similar in all cheeses, those containing EPS were softer than the control. Cocultured cheeses exhibited the greatest meltability. Cheeses containing WPC were softest in general; however, hardness remained unchanged over 45 d. Cheeses made with WPC had the least increase in meltability over time. Incorporation of WPC did not reduce surface scorching or increase shred fusion of cheese shreds during pizza baking; however, there was an improvement in these properties between d 7 and 45. Coating of the cheese shreds with oil was necessary for adequate browning, melt, and flow characteristics in all cheese types. © American Dairy Science Association, 2005.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalofdairyscience.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dairy Scienceen_HK
dc.subjectCocultureen_HK
dc.subjectExopolysaccharideen_HK
dc.subjectPreacidificationen_HK
dc.subjectWhey protein concentrateen_HK
dc.titleLow-fat mozzarella as influenced by microbial exopolysaccharides, preacidification, and whey protein concentrateen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailShah, NP: npshah@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityShah, NP=rp01571en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid15905427-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-26444480657en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-26444480657&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume88en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1973en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1985en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000229224500006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZisu, B=23995881100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShah, NP=7401823907en_HK

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