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Article: Acid, bile, and heat tolerance of free and microencapsulated probiotic bacteria

TitleAcid, bile, and heat tolerance of free and microencapsulated probiotic bacteria
Authors
KeywordsAcid tolerance
Bile tolerance
Microencapsulation
Probiotics
Issue Date2007
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0022-1147
Citation
Journal Of Food Science, 2007, v. 72 n. 9, p. M446-M450 How to Cite?
AbstractEight strains of probiotic bacteria, including Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Bifidobacterium longum, L. salivarius, L. plantarum, L. acidophilus, L. paracasei, B. lactis type Bl-O4, and B. lactis type Bi-07, were studied for their acid, bile, and heat tolerance. Microencapsulation in alginate matrix was used to enhance survival of the bacteria in acid and bile as well as a brief exposure to heat. Free probiotic organisms were used as a control. The acid tolerance of probiotic organisms was tested using HCl in MRS broth over a 2-h incubation period. Bile tolerance was tested using 2 types of bile salts, oxgall and taurocholic acid, over an 8-h incubation period. Heat tolerance was tested by exposing the probiotic organisms to 65°C for up to 1 h. Results indicated microencapsulated probiotic bacteria survived better (P < 0.05) than free probiotic bacteria in MRS containing HCl. When free probiotic bacteria were exposed to oxgall, viability was reduced by 6.51-log CFU/mL, whereas only 3.36-log CFU/mL was lost in microencapsulated strains. At 30 min of heat treatment, microencapsulated probiotic bacteria survived with an average loss of only 4.17-log CFU/mL, compared to 6.74-log CFU/mL loss with free probiotic bacteria. However, after 1 h of heating both free and microencapsulated probiotic strains showed similar losses in viability. Overall microencapsulation improved the survival of probiotic bacteria when exposed to acidic conditions, bile salts, and mild heat treatment. © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144408
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.649
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.839
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDing, WKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShah, NPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-20T09:01:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-20T09:01:53Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Food Science, 2007, v. 72 n. 9, p. M446-M450en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-1147en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144408-
dc.description.abstractEight strains of probiotic bacteria, including Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Bifidobacterium longum, L. salivarius, L. plantarum, L. acidophilus, L. paracasei, B. lactis type Bl-O4, and B. lactis type Bi-07, were studied for their acid, bile, and heat tolerance. Microencapsulation in alginate matrix was used to enhance survival of the bacteria in acid and bile as well as a brief exposure to heat. Free probiotic organisms were used as a control. The acid tolerance of probiotic organisms was tested using HCl in MRS broth over a 2-h incubation period. Bile tolerance was tested using 2 types of bile salts, oxgall and taurocholic acid, over an 8-h incubation period. Heat tolerance was tested by exposing the probiotic organisms to 65°C for up to 1 h. Results indicated microencapsulated probiotic bacteria survived better (P < 0.05) than free probiotic bacteria in MRS containing HCl. When free probiotic bacteria were exposed to oxgall, viability was reduced by 6.51-log CFU/mL, whereas only 3.36-log CFU/mL was lost in microencapsulated strains. At 30 min of heat treatment, microencapsulated probiotic bacteria survived with an average loss of only 4.17-log CFU/mL, compared to 6.74-log CFU/mL loss with free probiotic bacteria. However, after 1 h of heating both free and microencapsulated probiotic strains showed similar losses in viability. Overall microencapsulation improved the survival of probiotic bacteria when exposed to acidic conditions, bile salts, and mild heat treatment. © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0022-1147en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Food Scienceen_HK
dc.subjectAcid toleranceen_HK
dc.subjectBile toleranceen_HK
dc.subjectMicroencapsulationen_HK
dc.subjectProbioticsen_HK
dc.titleAcid, bile, and heat tolerance of free and microencapsulated probiotic bacteriaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailShah, NP: npshah@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityShah, NP=rp01571en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1750-3841.2007.00565.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18034741en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-36348932799en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-36348932799&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume72en_HK
dc.identifier.issue9en_HK
dc.identifier.spageM446en_HK
dc.identifier.epageM450en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000251394600045-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDing, WK=23008085200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShah, NP=7401823907en_HK

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