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Article: Enhancing the biotransformation of isoflavones in soymilk supplemented with lactose using probiotic bacteria during extended fermentation

TitleEnhancing the biotransformation of isoflavones in soymilk supplemented with lactose using probiotic bacteria during extended fermentation
Authors
KeywordsBioactive isoflavones
Lactose
Probiotic bacteria.
Issue Date2010
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0022-1147
Citation
Journal Of Food Science, 2010, v. 75 n. 3, p. M140-M149 How to Cite?
AbstractSoymilk (SM) lacks lactose; hence supplementation of SM with lactose is likely to enhance the growth of probiotic bacteria and biotransformation of isoflavone glycosides to isoflavone aglycones. In this study, 11 strains of probiotic bacteria including Lactobacillus rhamnosus, L. salivarius, L. plantarum, L. acidophilus, L. paracasei, HOWARU L. rhamnosus, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Bifidobacterium lactis type Bi-07, B. longum, HOWARU B. bifidum, and B lactis type Bi-04 were inoculated individually or as mixed cultures into SM and soymilk supplemented with lactose (SML). A total of 2% of lactose was added to 1 L of SM with the aim of improving the growth of probiotic organisms and promoting the biotransformation of isoflavone isomers to bioactive isoflavone aglycomes. Samples of SM were incubated at 37 °C and 10 mL aliquots of SM were taken at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h to monitor the growth of probiotic bacteria and changes in isoflavone contents using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).Results indicated that SML fermented with probiotics had higher viable counts by >2.4 log CFU/mL than that in SM at the end of the 72 h fermentation period. Mixed cultures grew at different rates and in general Lactobacilius spp. had >1.02 log CFU/mL more cells than Bifidobacterium spp. at the end of the fermentation period. The total aglycone content in SM at 72 h of fermentation was 0.924 mg/100 mL, whereas that in SML was 1.623 mg/100 mL. Addition of lactose not only improved the growth of probiotic bacteria in SM but also enhanced the biotransformation of isoflavone glucosides to the more bioactive isoflavone aglycones. Mixed cultures did not improve the biotransformation of bioactive isoflavones when compared to single cultures. © 2010 Institute of Food Technologists®.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144334
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.649
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.839
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDing, WKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShah, NPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-20T09:01:28Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-20T09:01:28Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Food Science, 2010, v. 75 n. 3, p. M140-M149en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-1147en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144334-
dc.description.abstractSoymilk (SM) lacks lactose; hence supplementation of SM with lactose is likely to enhance the growth of probiotic bacteria and biotransformation of isoflavone glycosides to isoflavone aglycones. In this study, 11 strains of probiotic bacteria including Lactobacillus rhamnosus, L. salivarius, L. plantarum, L. acidophilus, L. paracasei, HOWARU L. rhamnosus, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Bifidobacterium lactis type Bi-07, B. longum, HOWARU B. bifidum, and B lactis type Bi-04 were inoculated individually or as mixed cultures into SM and soymilk supplemented with lactose (SML). A total of 2% of lactose was added to 1 L of SM with the aim of improving the growth of probiotic organisms and promoting the biotransformation of isoflavone isomers to bioactive isoflavone aglycomes. Samples of SM were incubated at 37 °C and 10 mL aliquots of SM were taken at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h to monitor the growth of probiotic bacteria and changes in isoflavone contents using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).Results indicated that SML fermented with probiotics had higher viable counts by >2.4 log CFU/mL than that in SM at the end of the 72 h fermentation period. Mixed cultures grew at different rates and in general Lactobacilius spp. had >1.02 log CFU/mL more cells than Bifidobacterium spp. at the end of the fermentation period. The total aglycone content in SM at 72 h of fermentation was 0.924 mg/100 mL, whereas that in SML was 1.623 mg/100 mL. Addition of lactose not only improved the growth of probiotic bacteria in SM but also enhanced the biotransformation of isoflavone glucosides to the more bioactive isoflavone aglycones. Mixed cultures did not improve the biotransformation of bioactive isoflavones when compared to single cultures. © 2010 Institute of Food Technologists®.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0022-1147en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Food Scienceen_HK
dc.subjectBioactive isoflavonesen_HK
dc.subjectLactoseen_HK
dc.subjectProbiotic bacteria.en_HK
dc.titleEnhancing the biotransformation of isoflavones in soymilk supplemented with lactose using probiotic bacteria during extended fermentationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailShah, NP: npshah@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityShah, NP=rp01571en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1750-3841.2010.01526.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20492303-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77953906502en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77953906502&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume75en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spageM140en_HK
dc.identifier.epageM149en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1750-3841-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000276353000014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDing, WK=23008085200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShah, NP=7401823907en_HK

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