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Article: Mapping the brain in autism. A voxel-based MRI study of volumetric differences and intercorrelations in autism

TitleMapping the brain in autism. A voxel-based MRI study of volumetric differences and intercorrelations in autism
Authors
KeywordsAutism
Brain mapping
MRI
Issue Date2005
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Brain, 2005, v. 128 n. 2, p. 268-276 How to Cite?
AbstractAutism is a disorder of neurodevelopment resulting in pervasive abnormalities in social interaction and communication, repetitive behaviours and restricted interests. There is evidence for functional abnormalities and metabolic dysconnectivity in 'social brain' circuitry in this condition, but its structural basis has proved difficult to establish reliably. Explanations for this include replication difficulties inherent in 'region of interest' approaches usually adopted, and variable inclusion criteria for subjects across the autism spectrum. Moreover, despite a consensus that autism probably affects widely distributed brain regions, the issue of anatomical connectivity has received little attention. Therefore, we planned a fully automated voxel-based whole brain volumetric analysis in children with autism and normal IQ. We predicted that brain structural changes would be similar to those previously shown in adults with autism spectrum disorder and that a correlation analysis would suggest structural dysconnectivity. We included 17 stringently diagnosed children with autism and 17 age-matched controls. All children had IQ >80. Using Brain Activation and Morphological Mapping (BAMM) software, we measured global brain and tissue class volumes and mapped regional grey and white matter differences across the whole brain. With the expectation that volumes of interconnected regions correlate positively, we carried out a preliminary exploration of 'connectivity' in autism by comparing the nature of interregional grey matter volume correlations with control. Children with autism had a significant reduction in total grey matter volume and significant increase in CSF volume. They had significant localized grey matter reductions within fronto-striatal and parietal networks similar to findings in our previous study, and additional decreases in ventral and superior temporal grey matter. White matter was reduced in the cerebellum, left internal capsule and fornices. Correlation analysis revealed significantly more numerous and more positive grey matter volumetric correlations in controls compared with children with autism. Thus, using similar diagnostic criteria and image analysis methods in otherwise healthy populations with an autistic spectrum disorder from different countries, cultures and age groups, we report a number of consistent findings. Taken together, our data suggest abnormalities in the anatomy and connectivity of limbic-striatal 'social' brain systems which may contribute to the brain metabolic differences and behavioural phenotype in autism.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144327
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 10.103
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.097
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMcAlonan, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSuckling, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, GYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTai, KSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, DGMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChua, SEen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-20T09:01:04Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-20T09:01:04Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBrain, 2005, v. 128 n. 2, p. 268-276en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0006-8950en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144327-
dc.description.abstractAutism is a disorder of neurodevelopment resulting in pervasive abnormalities in social interaction and communication, repetitive behaviours and restricted interests. There is evidence for functional abnormalities and metabolic dysconnectivity in 'social brain' circuitry in this condition, but its structural basis has proved difficult to establish reliably. Explanations for this include replication difficulties inherent in 'region of interest' approaches usually adopted, and variable inclusion criteria for subjects across the autism spectrum. Moreover, despite a consensus that autism probably affects widely distributed brain regions, the issue of anatomical connectivity has received little attention. Therefore, we planned a fully automated voxel-based whole brain volumetric analysis in children with autism and normal IQ. We predicted that brain structural changes would be similar to those previously shown in adults with autism spectrum disorder and that a correlation analysis would suggest structural dysconnectivity. We included 17 stringently diagnosed children with autism and 17 age-matched controls. All children had IQ >80. Using Brain Activation and Morphological Mapping (BAMM) software, we measured global brain and tissue class volumes and mapped regional grey and white matter differences across the whole brain. With the expectation that volumes of interconnected regions correlate positively, we carried out a preliminary exploration of 'connectivity' in autism by comparing the nature of interregional grey matter volume correlations with control. Children with autism had a significant reduction in total grey matter volume and significant increase in CSF volume. They had significant localized grey matter reductions within fronto-striatal and parietal networks similar to findings in our previous study, and additional decreases in ventral and superior temporal grey matter. White matter was reduced in the cerebellum, left internal capsule and fornices. Correlation analysis revealed significantly more numerous and more positive grey matter volumetric correlations in controls compared with children with autism. Thus, using similar diagnostic criteria and image analysis methods in otherwise healthy populations with an autistic spectrum disorder from different countries, cultures and age groups, we report a number of consistent findings. Taken together, our data suggest abnormalities in the anatomy and connectivity of limbic-striatal 'social' brain systems which may contribute to the brain metabolic differences and behavioural phenotype in autism.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBrainen_HK
dc.rightsBrain. Copyright © Oxford University Press.-
dc.subjectAutismen_HK
dc.subjectBrain mappingen_HK
dc.subjectMRIen_HK
dc.titleMapping the brain in autism. A voxel-based MRI study of volumetric differences and intercorrelations in autismen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcAlonan, GM: mcalonan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, C: charlton@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChua, SE: sechua@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcAlonan, GM=rp00475en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, C=rp01574en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChua, SE=rp00438en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/brain/awh332en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15548557-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-13544267452en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros95186-
dc.identifier.hkuros115322-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-13544267452&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume128en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage268en_HK
dc.identifier.epage276en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000226605800007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcAlonan, GM=6603123011en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, V=7005439024en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, C=7202061845en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSuckling, J=7004124496en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, GY=16637697800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTai, KS=7101738949en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, L=7006233502en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurphy, DGM=7404062227en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChua, SE=7201550427en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike84122-

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