File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Differential effects on white-matter systems in high-functioning autism and Asperger's syndrome

TitleDifferential effects on white-matter systems in high-functioning autism and Asperger's syndrome
Authors
KeywordsAsperger
Autism
MRI
Issue Date2009
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM
Citation
Psychological Medicine, 2009, v. 39 n. 11, p. 1885-1893 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground Whether autism spectrum maps onto a spectrum of brain abnormalities and whether Asperger's syndrome (ASP) is distinct from high-functioning autism (HFA) are debated. White-matter maldevelopment is associated with autism and disconnectivity theories of autism are compelling. However, it is unknown whether children with ASP and HFA have distinct white-matter abnormalities.Method Voxel-based morphometry mapped white-matter volumes across the whole brain in 91 children. Thirty-six had autism spectrum disorder. A history of delay in phrase speech defined half with HFA; those without delay formed the ASP group. The rest were typically developing children, balanced for age, IQ, gender, maternal language and ethnicity. White-matter volumes in HFA and ASP were compared and each contrasted with controls.Results White-matter volumes around the basal ganglia were higher in the HFA group than ASP and higher in both autism groups than controls. Compared with controls, children with HFA had less frontal and corpus callosal white matter in the left hemisphere; those with ASP had less frontal and corpus callosal white matter in the right hemisphere with more white matter in the left parietal lobe.Conclusions HFA involved mainly left hemisphere white-matter systems; ASP affected predominantly right hemisphere white-matter systems. The impact of HFA on basal ganglia white matter was greater than ASP. This implies that aetiological factors and management options for autism spectrum disorders may be distinct. History of language acquisition is a potentially valuable marker to refine our search for causes and treatments in autism spectrum. © 2009 Cambridge University Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144314
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.491
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.843
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
ING Asia/Pacific and a University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

The autism research programme in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Hong Kong is supported by a donation from ING Asia/Pacific and a University of Hong Kong grant. We thank Ms Michelle Deng for her help with image preparation.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMcAlonan, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSuckling, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChua, SEen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-20T09:00:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-20T09:00:33Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Medicine, 2009, v. 39 n. 11, p. 1885-1893en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144314-
dc.description.abstractBackground Whether autism spectrum maps onto a spectrum of brain abnormalities and whether Asperger's syndrome (ASP) is distinct from high-functioning autism (HFA) are debated. White-matter maldevelopment is associated with autism and disconnectivity theories of autism are compelling. However, it is unknown whether children with ASP and HFA have distinct white-matter abnormalities.Method Voxel-based morphometry mapped white-matter volumes across the whole brain in 91 children. Thirty-six had autism spectrum disorder. A history of delay in phrase speech defined half with HFA; those without delay formed the ASP group. The rest were typically developing children, balanced for age, IQ, gender, maternal language and ethnicity. White-matter volumes in HFA and ASP were compared and each contrasted with controls.Results White-matter volumes around the basal ganglia were higher in the HFA group than ASP and higher in both autism groups than controls. Compared with controls, children with HFA had less frontal and corpus callosal white matter in the left hemisphere; those with ASP had less frontal and corpus callosal white matter in the right hemisphere with more white matter in the left parietal lobe.Conclusions HFA involved mainly left hemisphere white-matter systems; ASP affected predominantly right hemisphere white-matter systems. The impact of HFA on basal ganglia white matter was greater than ASP. This implies that aetiological factors and management options for autism spectrum disorders may be distinct. History of language acquisition is a potentially valuable marker to refine our search for causes and treatments in autism spectrum. © 2009 Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSMen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Medicineen_HK
dc.subjectAspergeren_HK
dc.subjectAutismen_HK
dc.subjectMRIen_HK
dc.titleDifferential effects on white-matter systems in high-functioning autism and Asperger's syndromeen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcAlonan, GM: mcalonan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, C: charlton@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChua, SE: sechua@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcAlonan, GM=rp00475en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, C=rp01574en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChua, SE=rp00438en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291709005728en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19356262-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70449686651en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros158840-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-70449686651&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume39en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1885en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1893en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1469-8978-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000271177500014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcAlonan, GM=6603123011en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, C=7202061845en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, V=7005439024en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, N=26432840200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSuckling, J=7004124496en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChua, SE=7201550427en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7861979-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats