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Article: Atypical antipsychotics and weight gain in chinese patients: A comparison of olanzapine and risperidone

TitleAtypical antipsychotics and weight gain in chinese patients: A comparison of olanzapine and risperidone
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherPhysicians Postgraduate Press, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psychiatrist.com
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Psychiatry, 2004, v. 65 n. 6, p. 864-866 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To compare the effect of olanzapine with that of risperidone on weight change among Chinese patients in Hong Kong. Method: The body weight of subjects maintained on olanzapine or risperidone treatment was recorded at the outpatient clinic of a teaching hospital. Pretreatment weight of the subjects was retrieved from case records. Subjects on olanzapine treatment were matched in sex, age, and diagnosis with those on risperidone treatment, and demographic and clinical data were analyzed. The study was conducted in May and June 2002. Results: Twenty-eight olanzapine-risperidone matched pairs were studied. All were diagnosed with DSM-IV schizophrenia. In patients treated with olanzapine and risperidone, respectively, mean ± SD duration of treatment with atypical neuroleptics was 103.5 ± 47.4 weeks and 93.2 ± 50.6 weeks (range, 21-255 weeks), and mean doses were 12.4 ± 6.7 mg/day and 4.5 ± 2.8 mg/day. The mean ± SD weight gain of subjects on treatment with olanzapine and risperidone, respectively, was 8.34 ± 5.97 kg (18.53 ± 13.27 lb) and 2.74 ± 8.09 kg (6.09 ± 17.98 lb) with a statistically significant difference at p < .005. Lower baseline body weight and body mass index were associated with greater weight gain in both olanzapine- and risperidone-treated subjects. Gender, age, mean daily dose, and duration of treatment had no effect on weight change. Conclusion: Treatment with olanzapine was associated with significantly greater weight gain than treatment with risperidone in Chinese schizophrenia patients in Hong Kong. The effect of adjunctive anticonvulsant treatment on weight gain requires further study. © Copyright 2004 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144312
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.408
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.042
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Een_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-20T09:00:29Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-20T09:00:29Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Psychiatry, 2004, v. 65 n. 6, p. 864-866en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0160-6689en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144312-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To compare the effect of olanzapine with that of risperidone on weight change among Chinese patients in Hong Kong. Method: The body weight of subjects maintained on olanzapine or risperidone treatment was recorded at the outpatient clinic of a teaching hospital. Pretreatment weight of the subjects was retrieved from case records. Subjects on olanzapine treatment were matched in sex, age, and diagnosis with those on risperidone treatment, and demographic and clinical data were analyzed. The study was conducted in May and June 2002. Results: Twenty-eight olanzapine-risperidone matched pairs were studied. All were diagnosed with DSM-IV schizophrenia. In patients treated with olanzapine and risperidone, respectively, mean ± SD duration of treatment with atypical neuroleptics was 103.5 ± 47.4 weeks and 93.2 ± 50.6 weeks (range, 21-255 weeks), and mean doses were 12.4 ± 6.7 mg/day and 4.5 ± 2.8 mg/day. The mean ± SD weight gain of subjects on treatment with olanzapine and risperidone, respectively, was 8.34 ± 5.97 kg (18.53 ± 13.27 lb) and 2.74 ± 8.09 kg (6.09 ± 17.98 lb) with a statistically significant difference at p < .005. Lower baseline body weight and body mass index were associated with greater weight gain in both olanzapine- and risperidone-treated subjects. Gender, age, mean daily dose, and duration of treatment had no effect on weight change. Conclusion: Treatment with olanzapine was associated with significantly greater weight gain than treatment with risperidone in Chinese schizophrenia patients in Hong Kong. The effect of adjunctive anticonvulsant treatment on weight gain requires further study. © Copyright 2004 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPhysicians Postgraduate Press, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psychiatrist.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Psychiatryen_HK
dc.titleAtypical antipsychotics and weight gain in chinese patients: A comparison of olanzapine and risperidoneen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, E: edwinlhm@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, E=rp01575en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.4088/JCP.v65n0620en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15291666-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4344632250en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-4344632250&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume65en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage864en_HK
dc.identifier.epage866en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000222862400020-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, E=7406967099en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, CM=7402612698en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, E=35768689300en_HK

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