File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Schizophrenia with prominent catatonic features ('catatonic schizophrenia'). III. Latent class analysis of the catatonic syndrome

TitleSchizophrenia with prominent catatonic features ('catatonic schizophrenia'). III. Latent class analysis of the catatonic syndrome
Authors
KeywordsCatatonia
Latent class analysis (LCA)
Schizophrenia
Issue Date2009
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/pnpbp
Citation
Progress In Neuro-Psychopharmacology And Biological Psychiatry, 2009, v. 33 n. 1, p. 81-85 How to Cite?
AbstractNo reports have yet been published on catatonia using latent class analysis (LCA). This study applied LCA to a large, diagnostically homogenous sample of patients with chronic schizophrenia who also presented with catatonic symptoms. A random sample of 225 Chinese inpatients with DSM-IV schizophrenia was selected from the long-stay wards of a psychiatric hospital. Their psychopathology, extrapyramidal motor status and level of functioning were evaluated with standardized rating scales. Catatonia was rated using a modified version of the Bush-Francis Catatonia Rating Scale. LCA was then applied to the 178 patients who presented with at least one catatonic sign. In LCA a four-class solution was found to fit best the statistical model. Classes 1, 2, 3 and 4 constituted 18%, 39.4%, 20.1% and 22.5% of the whole catatonic sample, respectively. Class 1 included patients with symptoms of 'automatic' phenomena (automatic obedience, Mitgehen, waxy flexibility). Class 2 comprised patients with 'repetitive/echo' phenomena (perseveration, stereotypy, verbigeration, mannerisms and grimacing). Class 3 contained patients with symptoms of 'withdrawal' (immobility, mutism, posturing, staring and withdrawal). Class 4 consisted of 'agitated/resistive' patients, who displayed symptoms of excitement, impulsivity, negativism and combativeness. The symptom composition of these 4 classes was nearly identical with that of the four factors identified by factor analysis in the same cohort of subjects in an earlier study. In multivariate regression analysis, the 'withdrawn' class was associated with higher scores on the Scale of Assessment of Negative Symptoms and lower and higher scores for negative and positive items respectively on the Nurses' Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation's (NOSIE). The 'automatic' class was associated with lower values on the Simpson-Angus Extrapyramidal Side Effects Scale, and the 'repetitive/echo' class with higher scores on the NOSIE positive items. These results provide preliminary support for the notion that chronic schizophrenia patients with catatonic features can be classified into 4 distinct syndromal groups on the basis of their motor symptoms. Identifying distinct catatonic syndromes would help to find their biological substrates and to develop specific therapeutic measures. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144305
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.361
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.794
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorUngvari, GSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGoggins, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, SKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorGerevich, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-20T09:00:24Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-20T09:00:24Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationProgress In Neuro-Psychopharmacology And Biological Psychiatry, 2009, v. 33 n. 1, p. 81-85en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0278-5846en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144305-
dc.description.abstractNo reports have yet been published on catatonia using latent class analysis (LCA). This study applied LCA to a large, diagnostically homogenous sample of patients with chronic schizophrenia who also presented with catatonic symptoms. A random sample of 225 Chinese inpatients with DSM-IV schizophrenia was selected from the long-stay wards of a psychiatric hospital. Their psychopathology, extrapyramidal motor status and level of functioning were evaluated with standardized rating scales. Catatonia was rated using a modified version of the Bush-Francis Catatonia Rating Scale. LCA was then applied to the 178 patients who presented with at least one catatonic sign. In LCA a four-class solution was found to fit best the statistical model. Classes 1, 2, 3 and 4 constituted 18%, 39.4%, 20.1% and 22.5% of the whole catatonic sample, respectively. Class 1 included patients with symptoms of 'automatic' phenomena (automatic obedience, Mitgehen, waxy flexibility). Class 2 comprised patients with 'repetitive/echo' phenomena (perseveration, stereotypy, verbigeration, mannerisms and grimacing). Class 3 contained patients with symptoms of 'withdrawal' (immobility, mutism, posturing, staring and withdrawal). Class 4 consisted of 'agitated/resistive' patients, who displayed symptoms of excitement, impulsivity, negativism and combativeness. The symptom composition of these 4 classes was nearly identical with that of the four factors identified by factor analysis in the same cohort of subjects in an earlier study. In multivariate regression analysis, the 'withdrawn' class was associated with higher scores on the Scale of Assessment of Negative Symptoms and lower and higher scores for negative and positive items respectively on the Nurses' Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation's (NOSIE). The 'automatic' class was associated with lower values on the Simpson-Angus Extrapyramidal Side Effects Scale, and the 'repetitive/echo' class with higher scores on the NOSIE positive items. These results provide preliminary support for the notion that chronic schizophrenia patients with catatonic features can be classified into 4 distinct syndromal groups on the basis of their motor symptoms. Identifying distinct catatonic syndromes would help to find their biological substrates and to develop specific therapeutic measures. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/pnpbpen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofProgress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatryen_HK
dc.subjectCatatoniaen_HK
dc.subjectLatent class analysis (LCA)en_HK
dc.subjectSchizophreniaen_HK
dc.titleSchizophrenia with prominent catatonic features ('catatonic schizophrenia'). III. Latent class analysis of the catatonic syndromeen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, E: edwinlhm@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, E=rp01575en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pnpbp.2008.10.010en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18992297-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-58149333440en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-58149333440&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume33en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage81en_HK
dc.identifier.epage85en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000263212200016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridUngvari, GS=7006092063en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGoggins, W=6701315434en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, SK=7202044788en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, E=7406967099en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGerevich, J=6701530198en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats