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Article: Safety study of transcutaneous focused ultrasound for non-invasive skin tightening in Asians

TitleSafety study of transcutaneous focused ultrasound for non-invasive skin tightening in Asians
Authors
KeywordsAsian
non-ablative
safety
tightening
ultrasound
Issue Date2011
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/34073
Citation
Lasers In Surgery And Medicine, 2011, v. 43 n. 5, p. 366-375 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground and Objectives Transcutaneous intense focused ultrasound has emerged as a novel technology for non-invasive skin tightening. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety profile of a transcutaneous focused ultrasound device for the treatment of facial skin laxity in Asians. Materials and Methods The patients received one to three full-face treatments with the transcutaneous focused ultrasound device. Three transducers (7.0 MHz, 3.0 mm focal depth; 7.0 MHz, 4.5 mm focal depth; 4.0 MHz, 4.5 mm focal depth) were used to deliver a single pass of microthermal coagulation zones without any topical anesthetics. Standardized photos were taken at baseline and at each follow-up with the Canfield Visia CR system® and were assessed by two independent physicians. Adverse effects were assessed up to 6 months post treatment. Subjective assessments in terms of pain and tolerability were also evaluated with patient questionnaires. Results Forty nine Chinese patients (skin types III-IV, mean age 53.3) completed a total of 68 treatment sessions. Transient erythema and edema were seen in the majority of patients. Focal bruising was present in up to 25% of treatment sessions. Two cases of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation were seen on the forehead at 1-month post-treatment. One patient experienced focal twitching over the lower eyelid at 1-month follow-up, which was clinically consistent with hemifacial spasm and was unrelated to the ultrasound device. The degree of pain during treatment was recorded as severe in 54.4% of treatment sessions. Conclusions Transcutaneous intense focused ultrasound appeared to be safe for non-invasive facial skin tightening in Asians. Adverse events were mild and transient. Pain control during treatment should be optimized. No serious permanent or delayed side effects were noted up to 6 months post treatment. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144276
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.135
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.977
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, NPYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShek, SYNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, CSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SGYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYeung, CKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, HHLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-20T08:59:06Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-20T08:59:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationLasers In Surgery And Medicine, 2011, v. 43 n. 5, p. 366-375en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0196-8092en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144276-
dc.description.abstractBackground and Objectives Transcutaneous intense focused ultrasound has emerged as a novel technology for non-invasive skin tightening. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety profile of a transcutaneous focused ultrasound device for the treatment of facial skin laxity in Asians. Materials and Methods The patients received one to three full-face treatments with the transcutaneous focused ultrasound device. Three transducers (7.0 MHz, 3.0 mm focal depth; 7.0 MHz, 4.5 mm focal depth; 4.0 MHz, 4.5 mm focal depth) were used to deliver a single pass of microthermal coagulation zones without any topical anesthetics. Standardized photos were taken at baseline and at each follow-up with the Canfield Visia CR system® and were assessed by two independent physicians. Adverse effects were assessed up to 6 months post treatment. Subjective assessments in terms of pain and tolerability were also evaluated with patient questionnaires. Results Forty nine Chinese patients (skin types III-IV, mean age 53.3) completed a total of 68 treatment sessions. Transient erythema and edema were seen in the majority of patients. Focal bruising was present in up to 25% of treatment sessions. Two cases of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation were seen on the forehead at 1-month post-treatment. One patient experienced focal twitching over the lower eyelid at 1-month follow-up, which was clinically consistent with hemifacial spasm and was unrelated to the ultrasound device. The degree of pain during treatment was recorded as severe in 54.4% of treatment sessions. Conclusions Transcutaneous intense focused ultrasound appeared to be safe for non-invasive facial skin tightening in Asians. Adverse events were mild and transient. Pain control during treatment should be optimized. No serious permanent or delayed side effects were noted up to 6 months post treatment. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/34073en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofLasers in Surgery and Medicineen_HK
dc.subjectAsianen_HK
dc.subjectnon-ablativeen_HK
dc.subjectsafetyen_HK
dc.subjecttighteningen_HK
dc.subjectultrasounden_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Groupen_HK
dc.subject.meshChinaen_HK
dc.subject.meshCosmetic Techniques - adverse effects - instrumentationen_HK
dc.subject.meshFace - ultrasonographyen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshSkin - ultrasonographyen_HK
dc.subject.meshSkin Aging - ethnologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshTransducersen_HK
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_HK
dc.subject.meshUltrasonic Therapy - adverse effects - instrumentation - methodsen_HK
dc.titleSafety study of transcutaneous focused ultrasound for non-invasive skin tightening in Asiansen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYu, CS: carolsyu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, SGY: gyho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYu, CS=rp00305en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SGY=rp01573en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/lsm.21070en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21674541-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79959292223en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79959292223&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume43en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage366en_HK
dc.identifier.epage375en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1096-9101-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292470000002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, NPY=36664256000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShek, SYN=35995822400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, CS=8856262400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SGY=35205331800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, CK=7201354123en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, HHL=24555248900en_HK

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