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Article: Perceiving path from optic flow

TitlePerceiving path from optic flow
Authors
KeywordsEye movement
Heading perception
Optic flow
Path perception
Translation and rotation
Issue Date2011
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
Journal Of Vision, 2011, v. 11 n. 1, article 22, p. 1-15 How to Cite?
AbstractWe examined how people perceive their path of traveling from optic flow. Observers viewed displays simulating their traveling on a circular path over a textured ground, a random-dot ground, or a dynamic random-dot ground display in which dots were periodically redrawn to remove extended dot motion trajectories (flow lines) in the flow field. Five viewing conditions were tested in which the simulated observer gaze direction was pointed to (1) a target on the path at 30° away from the initial heading, (2) a target at 15° outside of the path, (3) a target at 15° inside of the path, (4) along the instantaneous heading, or (5) along the Z-axis of the simulated environment. Path performance was similar for all three display conditions, indicating that observers did not rely on flow lines to perceive path from optic flow. Furthermore, contrary to the idea that looking where you want to go provides accurate path perception, path perception was accurate only when the simulated observer gaze direction pointed in the instantaneous heading direction. In contrast, heading perception was accurate and not affected by path curvature regardless of the simulated gaze direction. The results suggest that heading perception is more robust than path perception.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144250
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Australian Research Council
Medical Research Council, UKU.1055.02.001.00001.01
Funding Information:

This work was supported by the Australian Research Council and the Medical Research Council, UK (Project Code U.1055.02.001.00001.01 to AJC). We thank Marianne Peters for assistance with testing and data processing and Regine Armann for helpful comments on a draft of the manuscript.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, JCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-19T03:53:21Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-19T03:53:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Vision, 2011, v. 11 n. 1, article 22, p. 1-15en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144250-
dc.description.abstractWe examined how people perceive their path of traveling from optic flow. Observers viewed displays simulating their traveling on a circular path over a textured ground, a random-dot ground, or a dynamic random-dot ground display in which dots were periodically redrawn to remove extended dot motion trajectories (flow lines) in the flow field. Five viewing conditions were tested in which the simulated observer gaze direction was pointed to (1) a target on the path at 30° away from the initial heading, (2) a target at 15° outside of the path, (3) a target at 15° inside of the path, (4) along the instantaneous heading, or (5) along the Z-axis of the simulated environment. Path performance was similar for all three display conditions, indicating that observers did not rely on flow lines to perceive path from optic flow. Furthermore, contrary to the idea that looking where you want to go provides accurate path perception, path perception was accurate only when the simulated observer gaze direction pointed in the instantaneous heading direction. In contrast, heading perception was accurate and not affected by path curvature regardless of the simulated gaze direction. The results suggest that heading perception is more robust than path perception.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_HK
dc.subjectEye movementen_HK
dc.subjectHeading perceptionen_HK
dc.subjectOptic flowen_HK
dc.subjectPath perceptionen_HK
dc.subjectTranslation and rotationen_HK
dc.titlePerceiving path from optic flowen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, L:lili@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, L=rp00636en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/11.1.22en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79251584649en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros191306-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79251584649&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume11en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1en_HK
dc.identifier.epage15en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000287732900001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, L=26643188000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, JC=36628221400en_HK

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