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Article: The passive matrices of English infinitival complement clauses: Evidentials on the road to auxiliarihood?

TitleThe passive matrices of English infinitival complement clauses: Evidentials on the road to auxiliarihood?
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Co
Citation
Studies in Language, 2001, v. 25 n. 2, p. 255-296 How to Cite?
AbstractEnglish verbs of the believe type, which display variation between that-complements and infinitival complements, more often combine with infinitives as passives than as actives. Though there are good information/thematic structural reasons for this (Noël 1998b), the higher frequency of passive matrices could also be a concomitant of a grammaticalization process as a result of which (some of) these matrices are turning into auxiliary-like evidentials. Anderson’s (1986) four-part definition of true (grammaticalized) evidentials is used to establish whether they can qualify as such. The fact that passives are more tolerant of lexical (even dynamic) infinitives than actives (which prefer be and statives) is adduced as evidence of grammaticalization. Individual instances of the passive pattern are differentiated using three criteria of grammaticalization: frequency, expansion and intraparadigmatic variability.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143983
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.447
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.481
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNoël, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-03T04:44:27Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-03T04:44:27Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationStudies in Language, 2001, v. 25 n. 2, p. 255-296en_US
dc.identifier.issn0378-4177en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143983-
dc.description.abstractEnglish verbs of the believe type, which display variation between that-complements and infinitival complements, more often combine with infinitives as passives than as actives. Though there are good information/thematic structural reasons for this (Noël 1998b), the higher frequency of passive matrices could also be a concomitant of a grammaticalization process as a result of which (some of) these matrices are turning into auxiliary-like evidentials. Anderson’s (1986) four-part definition of true (grammaticalized) evidentials is used to establish whether they can qualify as such. The fact that passives are more tolerant of lexical (even dynamic) infinitives than actives (which prefer be and statives) is adduced as evidence of grammaticalization. Individual instances of the passive pattern are differentiated using three criteria of grammaticalization: frequency, expansion and intraparadigmatic variability.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Coen_US
dc.relation.ispartofStudies in Languageen_US
dc.titleThe passive matrices of English infinitival complement clauses: Evidentials on the road to auxiliarihood?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailNoel, D:dnoel@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityNoel, D=rp01170en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1075/sl.25.2.04noe-
dc.identifier.volume25en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage255en_US
dc.identifier.epage296en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000173972000003-

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