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Article: Dose-Response Relation Between Physical Activity and Cognitive Function: Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study
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TitleDose-Response Relation Between Physical Activity and Cognitive Function: Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study
 
AuthorsXu, L1
Jiang, CQ3
Lam, TH1
Zhang, WS3
Thomas, GN2
Cheng, KK2
 
KeywordsCognitive Function
Elderly
International Physical Activity Questionnaire
Physical Activity
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/annepidem
 
CitationAnnals Of Epidemiology, 2011, v. 21 n. 11, p. 857-863 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2011.06.002
 
AbstractPurpose: To examine, via cross-sectional analysis, the dose-response association between physical activity and cognitive function in Chinese subjects. Methods: A total of 27,651 participants aged 50 to 85 years were recruited from 2003 to 2008. Information on potential confounders, including demographic and anthropometric characteristics, socioeconomic position, lifestyle, and disease history, was collected by standardized interview and procedures. Cognitive function was assessed by the delayed 10-word recall test (DWRT). Results: When the International Physical Activity Questionnaire was used, we found that most of the participants were classified as physically active (53.1%), with 42.4% moderately active and 4.5% physically inactive. Significant dose-response relations across quintiles of metabolic equivalent value (METs) with DWRT score in participants with or without good self-rated health were found (all p for trend <.001). In participants with poor self-rated heath, compared with the first quintile of METs, those in the fifth quintile (highest METs) had a significantly reduced risk for mild cognitive impairment by 28% (adjusted odds ratio, 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.58-0.89, p < .01; p for trend = .006). After additional adjustment for depression, we found that the association between physical activity and DWRT score remained significant. Conclusions: A significant dose-response relationship between physical activity and cognitive function was found, and the association was more pronounced in participants with poor self-rated health. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.
 
ISSN1047-2797
2012 Impact Factor: 2.479
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.356
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2011.06.002
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000296077100009
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong Foundation for Educational Development and Research, Hong Kong
Guangzhou Public Health Bureau
Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau, Guangzhou, China
University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Funding Information:

This work was supported by The University of Hong Kong Foundation for Educational Development and Research, Hong Kong; the Guangzhou Public Health Bureau and the Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau, Guangzhou, China; and The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorXu, L
 
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQ
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WS
 
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GN
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KK
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-21T08:56:40Z
 
dc.date.available2011-12-21T08:56:40Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To examine, via cross-sectional analysis, the dose-response association between physical activity and cognitive function in Chinese subjects. Methods: A total of 27,651 participants aged 50 to 85 years were recruited from 2003 to 2008. Information on potential confounders, including demographic and anthropometric characteristics, socioeconomic position, lifestyle, and disease history, was collected by standardized interview and procedures. Cognitive function was assessed by the delayed 10-word recall test (DWRT). Results: When the International Physical Activity Questionnaire was used, we found that most of the participants were classified as physically active (53.1%), with 42.4% moderately active and 4.5% physically inactive. Significant dose-response relations across quintiles of metabolic equivalent value (METs) with DWRT score in participants with or without good self-rated health were found (all p for trend <.001). In participants with poor self-rated heath, compared with the first quintile of METs, those in the fifth quintile (highest METs) had a significantly reduced risk for mild cognitive impairment by 28% (adjusted odds ratio, 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.58-0.89, p < .01; p for trend = .006). After additional adjustment for depression, we found that the association between physical activity and DWRT score remained significant. Conclusions: A significant dose-response relationship between physical activity and cognitive function was found, and the association was more pronounced in participants with poor self-rated health. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAnnals Of Epidemiology, 2011, v. 21 n. 11, p. 857-863 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2011.06.002
 
dc.identifier.citeulike9613166
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2011.06.002
 
dc.identifier.epage863
 
dc.identifier.hkuros198044
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000296077100009
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong Foundation for Educational Development and Research, Hong Kong
Guangzhou Public Health Bureau
Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau, Guangzhou, China
University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Funding Information:

This work was supported by The University of Hong Kong Foundation for Educational Development and Research, Hong Kong; the Guangzhou Public Health Bureau and the Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau, Guangzhou, China; and The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom.

 
dc.identifier.issn1047-2797
2012 Impact Factor: 2.479
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.356
 
dc.identifier.issue11
 
dc.identifier.pmid21784658
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80053562297
 
dc.identifier.spage857
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143819
 
dc.identifier.volume21
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/annepidem
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Epidemiology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshChina - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshCognition - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshCohort Studies
 
dc.subject.meshMild Cognitive Impairment - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshMotor Activity - physiology
 
dc.subjectCognitive Function
 
dc.subjectElderly
 
dc.subjectInternational Physical Activity Questionnaire
 
dc.subjectPhysical Activity
 
dc.titleDose-Response Relation Between Physical Activity and Cognitive Function: Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. University of Birmingham
  3. Guangzhou No. 12 Hospital