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Article: Optimal design of studies of influenza transmission in households. I: Case-ascertained studies

TitleOptimal design of studies of influenza transmission in households. I: Case-ascertained studies
Authors
KeywordsEpidemiology
virus infection
Issue Date2012
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=HYG
Citation
Epidemiology And Infection, 2012, v. 140 n. 1, p. 106-114 How to Cite?
AbstractCase-ascertained household transmission studies, in which households including an index case are recruited and followed up, are invaluable to understanding the epidemiology of influenza. We used a simulation approach parameterized with data from household transmission studies to evaluate alternative study designs. We compared studies that relied on self-reported illness in household contacts vs. studies that used home visits to collect swab specimens for virological confirmation of secondary infections, allowing for the trade-off between sample size vs. intensity of follow-up given a fixed budget. For studies estimating the secondary attack proportion, 2-3 follow-up visits with specimens collected from all members regardless of illness were optimal. However, for studies comparing secondary attack proportions between two or more groups, such as controlled intervention studies, designs with reactive home visits following illness reports in contacts were most powerful, while a design with one home visit optimally timed also performed well. © 2011 Cambridge University Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143810
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.515
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.320
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Control of Infectious Disease, Food and Health Bureau, Government of the Hong Kong SARHK-10-04-05
Area of Excellence Scheme of the Hong Kong University Grants CommitteeAoE/M-12/06
Harvard Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences1 U54 GM088558
MedImmune Inc.
Research Grants Council, Hong Kong
Funding Information:

We thank Lincoln Lau for technical assistance. This work received financial support from the Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Disease, Food and Health Bureau, Government of the Hong Kong SAR (grant no. HK-10-04-05), the Area of Excellence Scheme of the Hong Kong University Grants Committee (grant no. AoE/M-12/06) and the Harvard Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (grant no. 1 U54 GM088558). B.J.C. has received study funding from MedImmune Inc., a manufacturer of influenza vaccines. B.K. is supported by a Hong Kong Ph.D. Fellowship from the Research Grants Council, Hong Kong. The funding bodies were not involved in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data, the writing of the manuscript, or the decision to submit for publication. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences or the National Institutes of Health.

References
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DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKlick, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-21T08:56:35Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-21T08:56:35Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEpidemiology And Infection, 2012, v. 140 n. 1, p. 106-114en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0950-2688en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143810-
dc.description.abstractCase-ascertained household transmission studies, in which households including an index case are recruited and followed up, are invaluable to understanding the epidemiology of influenza. We used a simulation approach parameterized with data from household transmission studies to evaluate alternative study designs. We compared studies that relied on self-reported illness in household contacts vs. studies that used home visits to collect swab specimens for virological confirmation of secondary infections, allowing for the trade-off between sample size vs. intensity of follow-up given a fixed budget. For studies estimating the secondary attack proportion, 2-3 follow-up visits with specimens collected from all members regardless of illness were optimal. However, for studies comparing secondary attack proportions between two or more groups, such as controlled intervention studies, designs with reactive home visits following illness reports in contacts were most powerful, while a design with one home visit optimally timed also performed well. © 2011 Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=HYGen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEpidemiology and Infectionen_HK
dc.rightsEpidemiology and Infection. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen_HK
dc.subjectvirus infectionen_HK
dc.subject.meshComputer Simulation-
dc.subject.meshData Collection - economics - methods-
dc.subject.meshEpidemiologic Research Design-
dc.subject.meshFamily Characteristics-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - epidemiology - transmission - virology-
dc.titleOptimal design of studies of influenza transmission in households. I: Case-ascertained studiesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ:bcowling@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0950268811000392en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21418717-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3179570-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-82455187800en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros198008en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-82455187800&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume140en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage106en_HK
dc.identifier.epage114en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000298547400014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.relation.projectControl of Pandemic and Inter-pandemic Influenza-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKlick, B=23090620800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowling, BJ=8644765500en_HK

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