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Article: An analysis of national target groups for monovalent 2009 pandemic influenza vaccine and trivalent seasonal influenza vaccines in 2009-10 and 2010-11

TitleAn analysis of national target groups for monovalent 2009 pandemic influenza vaccine and trivalent seasonal influenza vaccines in 2009-10 and 2010-11
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcinfectdis/
Citation
BMC Infectious Diseases, 2011, v. 11, article no. 230 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Vaccination is generally considered to be the best primary prevention measure against influenza virus infection. Many countries encourage specific target groups of people to undertake vaccination, often with financial subsidies or a priority list. To understand differential patterns of national target groups for influenza vaccination before, during and after the 2009 influenza pandemic, we reviewed and analyzed the country-specific policies in the corresponding time periods. METHODS: Information on prioritized groups targeted to receive seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines was derived from a multi-step internet search of official health department websites, press releases, media sources and academic journal articles. We assessed the frequency and consistency of targeting 20 different groups within populations which are associated with age, underlying medical conditions, role or occupations among different countries and vaccines. Information on subsidies provided to specific target groups was also extracted. RESULTS: We analyzed target groups for 33 (seasonal 2009 and 2009-10 vaccines), 72 (monovalent pandemic 2009-10 vaccine) and 34 (seasonal 2010 and 2010-11 vaccines) countries. In 2009-10, the elderly, those with chronic illness and health care workers were common targets for the seasonal vaccine. Comparatively, the elderly, care home residents and workers, animal contacts and close contacts were less frequently targeted to receive the pandemic vaccine. Pregnant women, obese persons, essential community workers and health care workers, however, were more commonly targeted. After the pandemic, pregnant women, obese persons, health care and care home workers, and close contacts were more commonly targeted to receive the seasonal vaccine compared to 2009-10, showing continued influence from the pandemic. Many of the countries provided free vaccines, partial subsidies, reimbursements or national health insurance coverage to specific target groups and over one-third of the countries offered universal subsidy regarding the pandemic vaccine. There was also some inconsistency between countries in target groups. CONCLUSIONS: Differences in target groups between countries may reflect variable objectives as well as uncertainties regarding the transmission dynamics, severity and age-specific immunity against influenza viruses before and after vaccination. Clarification on these points is essential to elucidate optimal and object-oriented vaccination strategies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143808
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.69
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.510
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Food and Health Bureau, Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative RegionHK-11-04-04
University Grants Committee of Hong KongAoE/M-12/06
JST
MedImmune Inc.
Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd.
Funding Information:

This work has received financial support from the Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Disease, Food and Health Bureau, Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (grant no. HK-11-04-04), and the Area of Excellence Scheme of the University Grants Committee of Hong Kong (grant no. AoE/M-12/06). HN is supported by the JST PRESTO program.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNishiura, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorIp, DKMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, ESTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-21T08:56:34Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-21T08:56:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBMC Infectious Diseases, 2011, v. 11, article no. 230en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1471-2334en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143808-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Vaccination is generally considered to be the best primary prevention measure against influenza virus infection. Many countries encourage specific target groups of people to undertake vaccination, often with financial subsidies or a priority list. To understand differential patterns of national target groups for influenza vaccination before, during and after the 2009 influenza pandemic, we reviewed and analyzed the country-specific policies in the corresponding time periods. METHODS: Information on prioritized groups targeted to receive seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines was derived from a multi-step internet search of official health department websites, press releases, media sources and academic journal articles. We assessed the frequency and consistency of targeting 20 different groups within populations which are associated with age, underlying medical conditions, role or occupations among different countries and vaccines. Information on subsidies provided to specific target groups was also extracted. RESULTS: We analyzed target groups for 33 (seasonal 2009 and 2009-10 vaccines), 72 (monovalent pandemic 2009-10 vaccine) and 34 (seasonal 2010 and 2010-11 vaccines) countries. In 2009-10, the elderly, those with chronic illness and health care workers were common targets for the seasonal vaccine. Comparatively, the elderly, care home residents and workers, animal contacts and close contacts were less frequently targeted to receive the pandemic vaccine. Pregnant women, obese persons, essential community workers and health care workers, however, were more commonly targeted. After the pandemic, pregnant women, obese persons, health care and care home workers, and close contacts were more commonly targeted to receive the seasonal vaccine compared to 2009-10, showing continued influence from the pandemic. Many of the countries provided free vaccines, partial subsidies, reimbursements or national health insurance coverage to specific target groups and over one-third of the countries offered universal subsidy regarding the pandemic vaccine. There was also some inconsistency between countries in target groups. CONCLUSIONS: Differences in target groups between countries may reflect variable objectives as well as uncertainties regarding the transmission dynamics, severity and age-specific immunity against influenza viruses before and after vaccination. Clarification on these points is essential to elucidate optimal and object-oriented vaccination strategies.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcinfectdis/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Infectious Diseasesen_HK
dc.rightsBMC Infectious Diseases. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza Vaccines - administration and dosage - immunology-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention and control - transmission - virology-
dc.subject.meshOrthomyxoviridae - immunology - isolation and purification-
dc.subject.meshPandemics-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.titleAn analysis of national target groups for monovalent 2009 pandemic influenza vaccine and trivalent seasonal influenza vaccines in 2009-10 and 2010-11en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWu, P: pengwu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailNishiura, H: nishiura@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailIp, DKM: dkmip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, EST: estherst@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityNishiura, H=rp01488en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2334-11-230en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21871096-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3175216-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052035040en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros198006en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80052035040&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume11, article no. 230en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000294968100001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.relation.projectControl of Pandemic and Inter-pandemic Influenza-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowling, BJ=8644765500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, EST=50461724100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIp, DKM=54924437400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNishiura, H=7005501836en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, P=50462552300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, S=34977173400en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9719953-

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