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Article: How does socioeconomic development affect COPD mortality? an age-period-cohort analysis from a recently transitioned population in China

TitleHow does socioeconomic development affect COPD mortality? an age-period-cohort analysis from a recently transitioned population in China
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
Plos One, 2011, v. 6 n. 9 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of death, particularly in developing countries. Little is known about the effects of economic development on COPD mortality, although economic development may potentially have positive and negative influences over the life course on COPD. We took advantage of a unique population whose rapid and recent economic development is marked by changes at clearly delineated and identifiable time points, and where few women smoke, to examine the effect of macro-level events on COPD mortality. Methods: We used Poisson regression to decompose sex-specific COPD mortality rates in Hong Kong from 1981 to 2005 into the effects of age, period and cohort. Results: COPD mortality declined strongly over generations for people born from the early to mid 20th century, which was particularly evident for the first generation to grow up in a more economically developed environment for both sexes. Population wide COPD mortality decreased when air quality improved and increased with increasing air pollution. COPD mortality increased with age, particularly after menopause among women. Conclusions: Economic development may reduce vulnerability to COPD by reducing long-lasting insults to the respiratory system, such as infections, poor nutrition and indoor air pollution. However, some of these gains may be offset if economic development results in increasing air pollution or increasing smoking. © 2011 Chen et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143805
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, JMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcGhee, SMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-21T08:56:32Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-21T08:56:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPlos One, 2011, v. 6 n. 9en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143805-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of death, particularly in developing countries. Little is known about the effects of economic development on COPD mortality, although economic development may potentially have positive and negative influences over the life course on COPD. We took advantage of a unique population whose rapid and recent economic development is marked by changes at clearly delineated and identifiable time points, and where few women smoke, to examine the effect of macro-level events on COPD mortality. Methods: We used Poisson regression to decompose sex-specific COPD mortality rates in Hong Kong from 1981 to 2005 into the effects of age, period and cohort. Results: COPD mortality declined strongly over generations for people born from the early to mid 20th century, which was particularly evident for the first generation to grow up in a more economically developed environment for both sexes. Population wide COPD mortality decreased when air quality improved and increased with increasing air pollution. COPD mortality increased with age, particularly after menopause among women. Conclusions: Economic development may reduce vulnerability to COPD by reducing long-lasting insults to the respiratory system, such as infections, poor nutrition and indoor air pollution. However, some of these gains may be offset if economic development results in increasing air pollution or increasing smoking. © 2011 Chen et al.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.actionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONEen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshAir Pollution - adverse effects-
dc.subject.meshChina-
dc.subject.meshPulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - mortality-
dc.subject.meshSmoking - adverse effects-
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factors-
dc.titleHow does socioeconomic development affect COPD mortality? an age-period-cohort analysis from a recently transitioned population in Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM:cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailJohnston, JM:jjohnsto@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ:hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcGhee, SM:smmcghee@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJohnston, JM=rp00375en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcGhee, SM=rp00393en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0024348en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21935399-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3174164-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052856328en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros197996en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80052856328&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume6en_HK
dc.identifier.issue9en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295041700026-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, J=53263321000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJohnston, JM=7403397964en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcGhee, SM=7003288588en_HK

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