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Article: Early experience in implementation of a learning assessment toolkit in the AOTrauma Geriatric Fracture course

TitleEarly experience in implementation of a learning assessment toolkit in the AOTrauma Geriatric Fracture course
Authors
KeywordsGeriatric trauma
Continuing medical education
Aging population
Geriatric medicine
Geriatric fracture
Issue Date2011
PublisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://gos.sagepub.com/
Citation
Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery & Rehabilitation, 2011, v. 2 n. 5-6, p. 163-171 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Surgical education is continually expanding to encompass new techniques and technologies. It is vital that educational activity is directed at gaps in knowledge and ability to improve the quality of learning. Aim: The aim of this study is to describe a published learning assessment toolkit when applied to participants attending AOTrauma Orthogeriatric Fracture courses. Methods: Precourse, participants received a questionnaire covering 10 competencies to assess knowledge gaps and a 20-question clinical knowledge test. The knowledge gap between perceived and desired knowledge was correlated with clinical knowledge test results to help course faculty focus the course curriculum to meet identified educational needs. A commitment to change survey was also administered. Results: Over 3 courses, 48% of registered attendees responded to the precourse survey, 44.5% responded postcourse. The precourse gap scores were generally highest for 2 competencies (“address secondary prevention,” “build a system of care”) indicating a higher level of motivation to learn in these topics and lowest for a variety of competencies (eg. “restore function early,” “co-manage patient care in the US surgeons group”) indicating lower motivation to learn in these competencies. These precourse gap scores guided adaptations in the course structure. Postcourse gaps were reduced in the 4 cohorts. Large improvements were seen in “Address secondary prevention” and “Build a system of care” in many of the cohorts. Competencies with the lowest precourse knowledge test scores were noted in each cohort. Where low pretest scores were noted, it highlighted the need for faculty to put appropriate emphasis on these topics in the delivery of the course content. Conclusion: The technique of evaluating and identifying gaps in knowledge and ability allows course designers to focus on areas of deficits. Measurable success was shown with a subjectively decreased gap score and objectively improved clinical knowledge, as demonstrated by improved test results after course completion.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143776
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorO'Malley, NTen_US
dc.contributor.authorCunningham, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorBlauth, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorKates, SLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-21T08:54:41Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-21T08:54:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationGeriatric Orthopaedic Surgery & Rehabilitation, 2011, v. 2 n. 5-6, p. 163-171en_US
dc.identifier.issn2151-4585-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143776-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Surgical education is continually expanding to encompass new techniques and technologies. It is vital that educational activity is directed at gaps in knowledge and ability to improve the quality of learning. Aim: The aim of this study is to describe a published learning assessment toolkit when applied to participants attending AOTrauma Orthogeriatric Fracture courses. Methods: Precourse, participants received a questionnaire covering 10 competencies to assess knowledge gaps and a 20-question clinical knowledge test. The knowledge gap between perceived and desired knowledge was correlated with clinical knowledge test results to help course faculty focus the course curriculum to meet identified educational needs. A commitment to change survey was also administered. Results: Over 3 courses, 48% of registered attendees responded to the precourse survey, 44.5% responded postcourse. The precourse gap scores were generally highest for 2 competencies (“address secondary prevention,” “build a system of care”) indicating a higher level of motivation to learn in these topics and lowest for a variety of competencies (eg. “restore function early,” “co-manage patient care in the US surgeons group”) indicating lower motivation to learn in these competencies. These precourse gap scores guided adaptations in the course structure. Postcourse gaps were reduced in the 4 cohorts. Large improvements were seen in “Address secondary prevention” and “Build a system of care” in many of the cohorts. Competencies with the lowest precourse knowledge test scores were noted in each cohort. Where low pretest scores were noted, it highlighted the need for faculty to put appropriate emphasis on these topics in the delivery of the course content. Conclusion: The technique of evaluating and identifying gaps in knowledge and ability allows course designers to focus on areas of deficits. Measurable success was shown with a subjectively decreased gap score and objectively improved clinical knowledge, as demonstrated by improved test results after course completion.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://gos.sagepub.com/-
dc.relation.ispartofGeriatric Orthopaedic Surgery & Rehabilitationen_US
dc.rightsGeriatric Orthopaedic Surgery & Rehabilitation. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc..-
dc.subjectGeriatric trauma-
dc.subjectContinuing medical education-
dc.subjectAging population-
dc.subjectGeriatric medicine-
dc.subjectGeriatric fracture-
dc.titleEarly experience in implementation of a learning assessment toolkit in the AOTrauma Geriatric Fracture courseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCunningham, M: michael.cunningham@aofoundation.orgen_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, F: klleunga@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, FKL=rp00297en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/2151458511423646-
dc.identifier.hkuros197933en_US
dc.identifier.volume2-
dc.identifier.issue5-6-
dc.identifier.spage163-
dc.identifier.epage171-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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