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Article: Transmissibility of seasonal and pandemic influenza in a cohort of households in Hong Kong in 2009

TitleTransmissibility of seasonal and pandemic influenza in a cohort of households in Hong Kong in 2009
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.com
Citation
Epidemiology, 2011, v. 22 n. 6, p. 793-796 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The household secondary attack proportion (SAP) is commonly used to measure the transmissibility of an infectious disease. Methods: We analyzed the final outbreak size distributions of pandemic A(H1N1), seasonal A(H1N1), and A(H3N2) infections identified in paired sera collected from members of 117 Hong Kong households in April and in August-October 2009. Results: The estimated community probability of infection overall was higher for children than adults; the probability was similar for pandemic A(H1N1) and seasonal A(H3N2) influenza. The household SAP for pandemic A(H1N1) was higher in children than in adults, whereas for seasonal A(H3N2), it was similar in children and adults. The estimated SAPs were similar for seasonal A(H3N2) and pandemic A(H1N1) after excluding persons with higher baseline antibody titers from analysis. Conclusions: Pandemic and seasonal influenza A viruses had similar age-specific transmissibility in a cohort of initially uninfected households, after adjustment for baseline immunity. © 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143771
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.075
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.981
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Institute of General Medical SciencesU54 GM088558
Government of the Hong Kong SARPHE-2
Area of Excellence Scheme of the Hong Kong University Grants CommitteeAoE/M-12/06
Research Grants Council, Hong Kong
JST PRESTO
MedImmune Inc.
Funding Information:

Supported by the Harvard Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (grant no. U54 GM088558), the Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Disease, Food and Health Bureau, Government of the Hong Kong SAR (grant no. PHE-2), and the Area of Excellence Scheme of the Hong Kong University Grants Committee (grant no. AoE/M-12/06). Supported by a Hong Kong PhD Fellowship from the Research Grants Council, Hong Kong (to B.K.), and JST PRESTO program (to H.N.).

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKlick, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorNishiura, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFang, VJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-21T08:54:24Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-21T08:54:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEpidemiology, 2011, v. 22 n. 6, p. 793-796en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1044-3983en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143771-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The household secondary attack proportion (SAP) is commonly used to measure the transmissibility of an infectious disease. Methods: We analyzed the final outbreak size distributions of pandemic A(H1N1), seasonal A(H1N1), and A(H3N2) infections identified in paired sera collected from members of 117 Hong Kong households in April and in August-October 2009. Results: The estimated community probability of infection overall was higher for children than adults; the probability was similar for pandemic A(H1N1) and seasonal A(H3N2) influenza. The household SAP for pandemic A(H1N1) was higher in children than in adults, whereas for seasonal A(H3N2), it was similar in children and adults. The estimated SAPs were similar for seasonal A(H3N2) and pandemic A(H1N1) after excluding persons with higher baseline antibody titers from analysis. Conclusions: Pandemic and seasonal influenza A viruses had similar age-specific transmissibility in a cohort of initially uninfected households, after adjustment for baseline immunity. © 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEpidemiologyen_HK
dc.titleTransmissibility of seasonal and pandemic influenza in a cohort of households in Hong Kong in 2009en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNishiura, H: nishiura@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNishiura, H=rp01488en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/EDE.0b013e3182302e8een_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21878814-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3206962-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80053616415en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros197995en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80053616415&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume22en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage793en_HK
dc.identifier.epage796en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295622000005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.relation.projectControl of Pandemic and Inter-pandemic Influenza-
dc.relation.projectThe attack rate, transmission dynamics and viral evolution in a cohort of Hong Kong families during an epidemic of novel influenza virus (H1N1)-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKlick, B=23090620800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNishiura, H=7005501836en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, S=34977173400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFang, VJ=24474130400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JSM=7005486823en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowling, BJ=8644765500en_HK

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