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Article: Development genetic analysis of general cognitive ability from 1 to 12 years in a sample of adoptees, biological siblings, and twins

TitleDevelopment genetic analysis of general cognitive ability from 1 to 12 years in a sample of adoptees, biological siblings, and twins
Authors
KeywordsChange
Continuity
Development
Environment
General cognitive ability
Genetics
Heritability
Issue Date2003
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/intell
Citation
Intelligence, 2003, v. 31 n. 1, p. 31-49 How to Cite?
AbstractWe report a longitudinal genetic analysis that combines twins and adoptive and nonadoptive siblings to investigate continuity and change in the etiology of general cognitive ability from infancy through the transition to adolescence. Research in childhood suggests that heritability increases and shared environmental influence decreases, that genetic factors contribute to change as well as continuity, that shared environment contributes entirely to continuity, and that nonshared environment contributes entirely to change. Twins from the Longitudinal Twin Study (LTS; 224 MZ pairs, 189 same-sex DZ pairs at 1 year) and adoptive (genetically unrelated) and nonadoptive (biological) siblings from the Colorado Adoption Project (CAP; 107 and 87 pairs, respectively, at 1 year) were assessed again at 2, 3, 4, 7, 9, and 10 years, and nontwin siblings were also assessed at 12 years. Longitudinal model fitting supported the above hypotheses derived from research in childhood with two exceptions. Nonshared environmental influences contribute to continuity as well as change in middle childhood. The most striking exception is that during the transition to adolescence, genetic factors no longer contribute to change, just to continuity. © 2003 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143621
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.118
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.665
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBishop, EGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCherny, SSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCorley, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorPlomin, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorDeFries, JCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHewitt, JKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-16T08:08:12Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-16T08:08:12Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationIntelligence, 2003, v. 31 n. 1, p. 31-49en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0160-2896en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143621-
dc.description.abstractWe report a longitudinal genetic analysis that combines twins and adoptive and nonadoptive siblings to investigate continuity and change in the etiology of general cognitive ability from infancy through the transition to adolescence. Research in childhood suggests that heritability increases and shared environmental influence decreases, that genetic factors contribute to change as well as continuity, that shared environment contributes entirely to continuity, and that nonshared environment contributes entirely to change. Twins from the Longitudinal Twin Study (LTS; 224 MZ pairs, 189 same-sex DZ pairs at 1 year) and adoptive (genetically unrelated) and nonadoptive (biological) siblings from the Colorado Adoption Project (CAP; 107 and 87 pairs, respectively, at 1 year) were assessed again at 2, 3, 4, 7, 9, and 10 years, and nontwin siblings were also assessed at 12 years. Longitudinal model fitting supported the above hypotheses derived from research in childhood with two exceptions. Nonshared environmental influences contribute to continuity as well as change in middle childhood. The most striking exception is that during the transition to adolescence, genetic factors no longer contribute to change, just to continuity. © 2003 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/intellen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofIntelligenceen_HK
dc.subjectChangeen_HK
dc.subjectContinuityen_HK
dc.subjectDevelopmenten_HK
dc.subjectEnvironmenten_HK
dc.subjectGeneral cognitive abilityen_HK
dc.subjectGeneticsen_HK
dc.subjectHeritabilityen_HK
dc.titleDevelopment genetic analysis of general cognitive ability from 1 to 12 years in a sample of adoptees, biological siblings, and twinsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCherny, SS: cherny@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCherny, SS=rp00232en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0160-2896(02)00112-5en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037210206en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037210206&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume31en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage31en_HK
dc.identifier.epage49en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000180369000003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBishop, EG=8515878600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCherny, SS=7004670001en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCorley, R=35478107400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPlomin, R=36050187200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDeFries, JC=7005658115en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHewitt, JK=7202713286en_HK

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