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Article: Traditional Chinese medicine (tongue acupuncture) in children with drooling problems

TitleTraditional Chinese medicine (tongue acupuncture) in children with drooling problems
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/pedneu
Citation
Pediatric Neurology, 2001, v. 25 n. 1, p. 47-54 How to Cite?
AbstractTongue acupuncture is an innovative technique in traditional Chinese medicine. We have demonstrated that specific tongue acupoints are related to various functional domains. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of tongue acupuncture in children with neurologic disability who had severe drooling problems. We conducted an intent-to-treat study in a cohort of 10 children. A continuous course of tongue acupuncture was performed daily to five acupoints in the tongue for a total of 30 sessions. Standardized outcome measures of drooling were evaluated by a blinded assessor to study the efficacy at baseline and after a course of treatment. Statistically significant improvement was noted in the following outcome measures: (1) mean visual analog scale (VAS) decreased from 6.6 (pre-TAC) to 4.67 (post-TAC) (P = 0.002); (2) mean drooling quotient (DQ) decreased from 14.016% (pre-TAC) to 8.335% (post-TAC) (P = 0.0078); and (3) mean drooling score (DS) decreased from 7.4 (pre-TAC) to 4.4 (post-TAC) (P = 0.002). This study demonstrated the efficacy of tongue acupuncture as an adjunctive or alternative treatment for patients with drooling problems and can be integrated as part of the oromotor stimulation program, drooling program, and behavioral modification program before subjecting the patient to invasive surgical procedures on the salivary glands. © 2001 by Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143567
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.866
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.819
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorSun, JGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Wen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-12T03:51:59Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-12T03:51:59Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPediatric Neurology, 2001, v. 25 n. 1, p. 47-54en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0887-8994en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143567-
dc.description.abstractTongue acupuncture is an innovative technique in traditional Chinese medicine. We have demonstrated that specific tongue acupoints are related to various functional domains. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of tongue acupuncture in children with neurologic disability who had severe drooling problems. We conducted an intent-to-treat study in a cohort of 10 children. A continuous course of tongue acupuncture was performed daily to five acupoints in the tongue for a total of 30 sessions. Standardized outcome measures of drooling were evaluated by a blinded assessor to study the efficacy at baseline and after a course of treatment. Statistically significant improvement was noted in the following outcome measures: (1) mean visual analog scale (VAS) decreased from 6.6 (pre-TAC) to 4.67 (post-TAC) (P = 0.002); (2) mean drooling quotient (DQ) decreased from 14.016% (pre-TAC) to 8.335% (post-TAC) (P = 0.0078); and (3) mean drooling score (DS) decreased from 7.4 (pre-TAC) to 4.4 (post-TAC) (P = 0.002). This study demonstrated the efficacy of tongue acupuncture as an adjunctive or alternative treatment for patients with drooling problems and can be integrated as part of the oromotor stimulation program, drooling program, and behavioral modification program before subjecting the patient to invasive surgical procedures on the salivary glands. © 2001 by Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/pedneuen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPediatric Neurologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAcupuncture Therapy/*methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Over Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshDevelopmental Disabilities/*complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.mesh*Medicine, Chinese Traditionalen_US
dc.subject.meshSeverity of Illness Indexen_US
dc.subject.meshSialorrhea/etiology/*therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshSingle-Blind Methoden_US
dc.subject.mesh*Tongueen_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_US
dc.titleTraditional Chinese medicine (tongue acupuncture) in children with drooling problemsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, V:vcnwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, V=rp00334en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0887-8994(01)00292-2en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11483396-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034907261en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034907261&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume25en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage47en_HK
dc.identifier.epage54en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000170351500006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, V=7202525632en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, JG=15056903700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, W=13310222200en_HK

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