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Article: Use of chopsticks in Chinese children

TitleUse of chopsticks in Chinese children
Authors
KeywordsChildren
Chinese
Chopsticks
Eating
Functional independence measure
WeeFIM
Issue Date2002
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CCH
Citation
Child: Care, Health And Development, 2002, v. 28 n. 2, p. 157-161 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective. There has been no study on the developmental stage of acquiring the skill of using chopsticks, which is a common eating tool of the Orientals. We aimed to obtain a developmental profile for achieving the skills of chopsticks manipulation in Chinese children and to assess the correlation between chopsticks manipulation and the level of achieving independence in 'eating' item in the Functional Independence Measure of children (WeeFIM). We also studied the relationship between demographic and environmental factors and the age of achieving chopstick manipulation. Methods. Direct interview with the mothers of 445 non-disabled children who were randomly selected from the community. A chopsticks score (CS) of 1 was defined as children who could use chopsticks to finish more than half the meal, and a CS of 0 as failure to do so. Results. The mean age of achieving a CS of 1 was 4.6 years. At 6.7 years, all these children achieved this skill. There was a significant relationship between age of achieving the skills of chopsticks and the level of attaining independence in 'WeeFIM eating' score. (P < 0.001) However, there was no correlation of age of achieving CS of 1 with sex, social class or the presence of a domestic helper. Conclusion. Most non-disabled Chinese children can achieve the visual motor skill of using chopsticks at 4.6 years. There was also a correlation with the age of achieving independence in the WeeFIM eating score. The skill of using chopsticks should be added as part of the tools, apart from spoons or forks, for scoring WeeFIM in Chinese children.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143566
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.754
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.741
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Wen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-12T03:51:58Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-12T03:51:58Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationChild: Care, Health And Development, 2002, v. 28 n. 2, p. 157-161en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0305-1862en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143566-
dc.description.abstractObjective. There has been no study on the developmental stage of acquiring the skill of using chopsticks, which is a common eating tool of the Orientals. We aimed to obtain a developmental profile for achieving the skills of chopsticks manipulation in Chinese children and to assess the correlation between chopsticks manipulation and the level of achieving independence in 'eating' item in the Functional Independence Measure of children (WeeFIM). We also studied the relationship between demographic and environmental factors and the age of achieving chopstick manipulation. Methods. Direct interview with the mothers of 445 non-disabled children who were randomly selected from the community. A chopsticks score (CS) of 1 was defined as children who could use chopsticks to finish more than half the meal, and a CS of 0 as failure to do so. Results. The mean age of achieving a CS of 1 was 4.6 years. At 6.7 years, all these children achieved this skill. There was a significant relationship between age of achieving the skills of chopsticks and the level of attaining independence in 'WeeFIM eating' score. (P < 0.001) However, there was no correlation of age of achieving CS of 1 with sex, social class or the presence of a domestic helper. Conclusion. Most non-disabled Chinese children can achieve the visual motor skill of using chopsticks at 4.6 years. There was also a correlation with the age of achieving independence in the WeeFIM eating score. The skill of using chopsticks should be added as part of the tools, apart from spoons or forks, for scoring WeeFIM in Chinese children.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CCHen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofChild: Care, Health and Developmenten_HK
dc.subjectChildrenen_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectChopsticksen_HK
dc.subjectEatingen_HK
dc.subjectFunctional independence measureen_HK
dc.subjectWeeFIMen_HK
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild Development/*physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.mesh*Cooking and Eating Utensilsen_US
dc.subject.meshFeeding Behavior/*physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfanten_US
dc.subject.meshInterviews as Topicen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.mesh*Motor Skillsen_US
dc.titleUse of chopsticks in Chinese childrenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, V:vcnwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, V=rp00334en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1365-2214.2002.00256.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11952651-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036320087en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036320087&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume28en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage157en_HK
dc.identifier.epage161en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000174710300005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, S=36882453700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, K=55230963900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, V=7202525632en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, W=7403972688en_HK

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