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Article: Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and blood mercury level: A case-control study in Chinese children

TitleAttention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and blood mercury level: A case-control study in Chinese children
Authors
KeywordsAttention-deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
Case-control study
Children
Mercury
Issue Date2006
Citation
Neuropediatrics, 2006, v. 37 n. 4, p. 234-240 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To investigate the association between blood mercury level and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in Chinese children in Hong Kong. Methods: Fifty-two children with ADHD aged below 18 years diagnosed by DSM IV criteria without perinatal brain insults, mental retardation or neurological deficits were recruited from a developmental assessment center. Fifty-nine normal controls were recruited from a nearby hospital. Blood mercury levels were measured by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results: The mean ages of cases and controls were 7.06 and 7.81 years respectively. Boys predominated (case = 44 [84.6%], control = 44 [74.6%]). There was significant difference in blood mercury levels between cases and controls (geometric mean 18.2 nmol/L [95% CI 15.4-21.5 nmol/L] vs. 11.6 nmol/L [95% CI 9.9-13.7 nmol/L], p < 0.001), which persists after adjustment for age, gender and parental occupational status (p < 0.001). The geometric mean blood mercury level was also significantly higher in children with inattentive (19.4 nmol/L, 95% CI 13.3-28.5 nmol/L) and combined (18.0 nmol/L, 95% CI 14.9-21.8 nmol/L) subtypes of ADHD. Blood mercury levels were above 29 nmol/L in 17 (26.9%) cases and 6 (10.2%) controls. Children with blood mercury level above 29 nmol/L had 9.69 times (95% CI 2.57-36.5) higher risk of having ADHD after adjustment for confounding variables. Conclusion: High blood mercury level was associated with ADHD. Whether the relationship is causal requires further studies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143532
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.291
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.550
ISI Accession Number ID
References
Errata

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheuk, DKLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Ven_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-12T03:51:34Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-12T03:51:34Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNeuropediatrics, 2006, v. 37 n. 4, p. 234-240en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0174-304Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143532-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To investigate the association between blood mercury level and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in Chinese children in Hong Kong. Methods: Fifty-two children with ADHD aged below 18 years diagnosed by DSM IV criteria without perinatal brain insults, mental retardation or neurological deficits were recruited from a developmental assessment center. Fifty-nine normal controls were recruited from a nearby hospital. Blood mercury levels were measured by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results: The mean ages of cases and controls were 7.06 and 7.81 years respectively. Boys predominated (case = 44 [84.6%], control = 44 [74.6%]). There was significant difference in blood mercury levels between cases and controls (geometric mean 18.2 nmol/L [95% CI 15.4-21.5 nmol/L] vs. 11.6 nmol/L [95% CI 9.9-13.7 nmol/L], p < 0.001), which persists after adjustment for age, gender and parental occupational status (p < 0.001). The geometric mean blood mercury level was also significantly higher in children with inattentive (19.4 nmol/L, 95% CI 13.3-28.5 nmol/L) and combined (18.0 nmol/L, 95% CI 14.9-21.8 nmol/L) subtypes of ADHD. Blood mercury levels were above 29 nmol/L in 17 (26.9%) cases and 6 (10.2%) controls. Children with blood mercury level above 29 nmol/L had 9.69 times (95% CI 2.57-36.5) higher risk of having ADHD after adjustment for confounding variables. Conclusion: High blood mercury level was associated with ADHD. Whether the relationship is causal requires further studies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNeuropediatricsen_HK
dc.subjectAttention-deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)en_HK
dc.subjectCase-control studyen_HK
dc.subjectChildrenen_HK
dc.subjectMercuryen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAttention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/*blood/epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshChina/epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDemographyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMercury/*blooden_US
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratioen_US
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_US
dc.titleAttention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and blood mercury level: A case-control study in Chinese childrenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, V:vcnwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, V=rp00334en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1055/s-2006-924577en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17177150-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33846262204en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33846262204&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume37en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage234en_HK
dc.identifier.epage240en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000243225900005-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_HK
dc.relation.erratumdoi:10.1055/s-0029-1242177-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheuk, DKL=8705936100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, V=7202525632en_HK

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