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Article: Abnormalities in the anterior cingulate cortex associated with attentional and inhibitory control deficits: A neurophysiological study on children with autism spectrum disorders

TitleAbnormalities in the anterior cingulate cortex associated with attentional and inhibitory control deficits: A neurophysiological study on children with autism spectrum disorders
Authors
KeywordsAnterior cingulate
Attention
Autism
Children
EEG
Inhibitory control
Issue Date2011
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/709651
Citation
Research In Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2011, v. 5 n. 1, p. 254-266 How to Cite?
AbstractPrevious studies showed that the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is activated when individuals engage in attention and inhibitory control tasks. The present study examined whether ACC activity is associated with behavioral performance of the two tasks. Twenty normal and 20 children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) were subjected to neuropsychological assessments on attention and inhibitory control, as well as electroencephalography recording. Children with ASD performed significantly worse than normal children on attention tasks as shown in their poorer performance on the Digit Span test, the greater number of Omission Errors on both the Continuous Performance Test II and the Go/No-Go tasks. They also performed significantly worse than normal children on inhibitory control tasks as shown by the greater number of False Alarms on the Object Recognition and Hong Kong List Learning Test. Their ACC activities, as indicated by relative theta power, were found to be significantly lower than those of normal controls during performance of the Go/No-Go task. Depressed ACC activities were further found to be significantly associated with poorer performance in attention and inhibition. Clinical implications on the use of theta activities in the ACC as an indicator to monitor intervention progress in children with ASD were discussed. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143527
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.317
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.992
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, ASen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHan, YMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, WWMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, VCNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, MCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-12T03:51:31Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-12T03:51:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationResearch In Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2011, v. 5 n. 1, p. 254-266en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1750-9467en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143527-
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies showed that the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is activated when individuals engage in attention and inhibitory control tasks. The present study examined whether ACC activity is associated with behavioral performance of the two tasks. Twenty normal and 20 children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) were subjected to neuropsychological assessments on attention and inhibitory control, as well as electroencephalography recording. Children with ASD performed significantly worse than normal children on attention tasks as shown in their poorer performance on the Digit Span test, the greater number of Omission Errors on both the Continuous Performance Test II and the Go/No-Go tasks. They also performed significantly worse than normal children on inhibitory control tasks as shown by the greater number of False Alarms on the Object Recognition and Hong Kong List Learning Test. Their ACC activities, as indicated by relative theta power, were found to be significantly lower than those of normal controls during performance of the Go/No-Go task. Depressed ACC activities were further found to be significantly associated with poorer performance in attention and inhibition. Clinical implications on the use of theta activities in the ACC as an indicator to monitor intervention progress in children with ASD were discussed. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/709651en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofResearch in Autism Spectrum Disordersen_HK
dc.subjectAnterior cingulateen_HK
dc.subjectAttentionen_HK
dc.subjectAutismen_HK
dc.subjectChildrenen_HK
dc.subjectEEGen_HK
dc.subjectInhibitory controlen_HK
dc.titleAbnormalities in the anterior cingulate cortex associated with attentional and inhibitory control deficits: A neurophysiological study on children with autism spectrum disordersen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, VCN:vcnwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, VCN=rp00334en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.rasd.2010.04.007en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77957347767en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros183157-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77957347767&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume5en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage254en_HK
dc.identifier.epage266en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000283953800027-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, AS=7403167842en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHan, YMY=23469018100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, WWM=24776295100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, C=8206219600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, VCN=7202525632en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, MC=7201897484en_HK

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