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Article: Pilot study of positron emission tomography (PET) brain glucose metabolism to assess the efficacy of tongue and body acupuncture in cerebral palsy

TitlePilot study of positron emission tomography (PET) brain glucose metabolism to assess the efficacy of tongue and body acupuncture in cerebral palsy
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcn.sagepub.com
Citation
Journal Of Child Neurology, 2006, v. 21 n. 6, p. 455-462 How to Cite?
AbstractWe aimed to assess the efficacy of tongue and body acupuncture with clinical function and brain glucose metabolism in children with a severe type of cerebral palsy. Four children were recruited. The motor function belonged to grade 5 of the Gross Motor Function Measure (ie, completely nonambulatory). Daily tongue and body acupuncture was applied for 5 days a week for 8 weeks. The Functional Independence Scale for Children (WeeFIM), Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGIS), and positron emission tomography of the brain with [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) were performed at baseline and after acupuncture. None of the children had any significant change in the Functional Independence Scale for Children score, despite the fact that all mothers scored 3 on the Clinical Global Impression Scale (ie, 25% improvement) in overall function. The brain glucose metabolism, however, showed a > 10% increase in the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital cortices and cerebellum. Thus, a short course of tongue and body acupuncture was shown to increase brain glucose metabolism, despite lacking any clinical functional improvement seen within the 8-week course, possibly owing to the severity of the motor dysfunction and the short duration of treatment. The objective increase in brain glucose metabolism might serve as a surrogate marker for assessing the subclinical efficacy of an alternative treatment before any objective clinical improvement is evident. A larger-scale study for different degrees of severity of cerebral palsy and an impairment model should be undertaken to correlate clinical with neurometabolic change.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143523
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.434
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.694
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, VCNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSun, JGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYeung, DWCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-12T03:51:30Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-12T03:51:30Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Child Neurology, 2006, v. 21 n. 6, p. 455-462en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0883-0738en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143523-
dc.description.abstractWe aimed to assess the efficacy of tongue and body acupuncture with clinical function and brain glucose metabolism in children with a severe type of cerebral palsy. Four children were recruited. The motor function belonged to grade 5 of the Gross Motor Function Measure (ie, completely nonambulatory). Daily tongue and body acupuncture was applied for 5 days a week for 8 weeks. The Functional Independence Scale for Children (WeeFIM), Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGIS), and positron emission tomography of the brain with [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) were performed at baseline and after acupuncture. None of the children had any significant change in the Functional Independence Scale for Children score, despite the fact that all mothers scored 3 on the Clinical Global Impression Scale (ie, 25% improvement) in overall function. The brain glucose metabolism, however, showed a > 10% increase in the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital cortices and cerebellum. Thus, a short course of tongue and body acupuncture was shown to increase brain glucose metabolism, despite lacking any clinical functional improvement seen within the 8-week course, possibly owing to the severity of the motor dysfunction and the short duration of treatment. The objective increase in brain glucose metabolism might serve as a surrogate marker for assessing the subclinical efficacy of an alternative treatment before any objective clinical improvement is evident. A larger-scale study for different degrees of severity of cerebral palsy and an impairment model should be undertaken to correlate clinical with neurometabolic change.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcn.sagepub.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Child Neurologyen_HK
dc.subject.mesh*Acupuncture Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain/*metabolism/radionuclide imagingen_US
dc.subject.meshCerebral Palsy/*metabolism/radionuclide imaging/*therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFluorodeoxyglucose F18/diagnostic useen_US
dc.subject.meshGlucose/*metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfanten_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPilot Projectsen_US
dc.subject.meshPositron-Emission Tomographyen_US
dc.subject.meshRadiopharmaceuticals/diagnostic useen_US
dc.subject.meshTongueen_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_US
dc.titlePilot study of positron emission tomography (PET) brain glucose metabolism to assess the efficacy of tongue and body acupuncture in cerebral palsyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, VCN:vcnwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, VCN=rp00334en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.2310/7010.2006.00101en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16948928en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33746078111en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33746078111&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume21en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage455en_HK
dc.identifier.epage462en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000239469500004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, VCN=7202525632en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, JG=15056903700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, DWC=7103391359en_HK

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