File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Functional independence measure for children: A comparison of Chinese and Japanese children

TitleFunctional independence measure for children: A comparison of Chinese and Japanese children
Authors
KeywordsChildren
Chinese
Functional Independence Measure
Japan
WeeFIM
Issue Date2007
PublisherSage Science Press (US). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=336
Citation
Neurorehabilitation And Neural Repair, 2007, v. 21 n. 1, p. 91-96 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective. The Functional Independence Measure for Children (WeeFIM) is a simple-to-administer scale for assessing functional independence across 3 domains (self-care, mobility, cognition) in children. There are normative data from America and Japan. In 2001 to 2002, the authors created a normative Chinese WeeFIM profile and compared this with the American one. In this study, they aimed to compare their Chinese normative data with the Japanese one. Methods. A random sampling of 445 normal Chinese children from different social classes in Hong Kong was conducted in the community. It was conducted via face-to-face interviews with the mother, and a normative database was created. Results. Similar to the Japanese children, the WeeFIM total score and 3 main domain subscores (self-care, mobility, and cognition) increased progressively with age. In the self-care domain, Chinese children achieved modified independence or level 6 earlier in all items except toileting. For the mobility domain, the item chair transfer was achieved earlier in the Chinese children, whereas toilet transfer, stair, tub transfer, and locomotion were achieved later in Chinese children. As for cognition domain, the item problem solving was achieved earlier but comprehension, social interaction, and memory were achieved later in the Chinese children. The authors' results showed the same pattern of increasing WeeFIM score with increasing chronological age, which is similar to the Japanese children. There are 3 patterns of WeeFIM score achievement in this Chinese cohort. As for the Japanese children, the 3 patterns of WeeFIM score achievement from independent to dependent are 1) rapid change, 2) gradual change, and 3) linear change. Conclusions. WeeFIM is a validated standardized tool for assessing the outcome of rehabilitation programs. It should be widely used to assess rehabilitative achievement in children from different ethnic origins. The authors' previous study and this current study demonstrated that the authors' normative WeeFIM profile showed similar results to the American and Japanese children. However, there are minor differences in the WeeFIM scoring in the 3 main domains, which might be due to cultural differences between ethnic groups. Thus, usage of the WeeFIM with a different age criteria in achieving independence according to local culture should be adopted. Copyright © 2007 The American Society of Neurorehabilitation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143513
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.035
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.514
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, SSNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, VCNen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-12T03:51:23Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-12T03:51:23Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNeurorehabilitation And Neural Repair, 2007, v. 21 n. 1, p. 91-96en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1545-9683en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143513-
dc.description.abstractObjective. The Functional Independence Measure for Children (WeeFIM) is a simple-to-administer scale for assessing functional independence across 3 domains (self-care, mobility, cognition) in children. There are normative data from America and Japan. In 2001 to 2002, the authors created a normative Chinese WeeFIM profile and compared this with the American one. In this study, they aimed to compare their Chinese normative data with the Japanese one. Methods. A random sampling of 445 normal Chinese children from different social classes in Hong Kong was conducted in the community. It was conducted via face-to-face interviews with the mother, and a normative database was created. Results. Similar to the Japanese children, the WeeFIM total score and 3 main domain subscores (self-care, mobility, and cognition) increased progressively with age. In the self-care domain, Chinese children achieved modified independence or level 6 earlier in all items except toileting. For the mobility domain, the item chair transfer was achieved earlier in the Chinese children, whereas toilet transfer, stair, tub transfer, and locomotion were achieved later in Chinese children. As for cognition domain, the item problem solving was achieved earlier but comprehension, social interaction, and memory were achieved later in the Chinese children. The authors' results showed the same pattern of increasing WeeFIM score with increasing chronological age, which is similar to the Japanese children. There are 3 patterns of WeeFIM score achievement in this Chinese cohort. As for the Japanese children, the 3 patterns of WeeFIM score achievement from independent to dependent are 1) rapid change, 2) gradual change, and 3) linear change. Conclusions. WeeFIM is a validated standardized tool for assessing the outcome of rehabilitation programs. It should be widely used to assess rehabilitative achievement in children from different ethnic origins. The authors' previous study and this current study demonstrated that the authors' normative WeeFIM profile showed similar results to the American and Japanese children. However, there are minor differences in the WeeFIM scoring in the 3 main domains, which might be due to cultural differences between ethnic groups. Thus, usage of the WeeFIM with a different age criteria in achieving independence according to local culture should be adopted. Copyright © 2007 The American Society of Neurorehabilitation.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Science Press (US). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=336en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofNeurorehabilitation and Neural Repairen_HK
dc.subjectChildrenen_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectFunctional Independence Measureen_HK
dc.subjectJapanen_HK
dc.subjectWeeFIMen_HK
dc.subject.mesh*Activities of Daily Livingen_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group/*psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild Behavior/*ethnology/*physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshCognition/*physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong/ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfanten_US
dc.subject.meshJapan/ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMotor Activity/*physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshReference Valuesen_US
dc.titleFunctional independence measure for children: A comparison of Chinese and Japanese childrenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, VCN:vcnwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, VCN=rp00334en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1545968306290225en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17172559-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33845513812en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33845513812&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume21en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage91en_HK
dc.identifier.epage96en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000243001900011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, SSN=15521579900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, VCN=7202525632en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats