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Article: Cortical blindness in children: A study of etiology and prognosis

TitleCortical blindness in children: A study of etiology and prognosis
Authors
Issue Date1991
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/pedneu
Citation
Pediatric Neurology, 1991, v. 7 n. 3, p. 178-185 How to Cite?
AbstractThirty-four children (20 boys, 14 girls) with congenital and acquired cortical blindness were analyzed for visual outcome in relation to etiology, visual evoked potentials, electroencephalography, and cranial computed tomography. All 7 children with congenital cortical blindness remained blind on subsequent examination. Of the 27 children with acquired blindness, 16 (59%) had poor visual outcome. Poor visual outcome occurred in those with cardiac arrest, hypoxia, status epilepticus, intracranial hemorrhage, cerebral thrombosis, and head trauma. Good visual outcome occurred in children with hypotensive episodes after cardiac surgery. Of the 12 children with recovery of vision, the interval from acute loss of vision to partial or total recovery was 2 weeks to 5 months. Seven children had complete recovery of vision with no residual visual field defect. The majority of children (87%) had focal or multifocal spike-and-waves and slow sharp-wave discharges on electroencephalography. None had photic recruitment response or occipital spike-and-wave discharges. Flash visual evoked potential studies performed during acute episodes of cortical blindness documented 11 with absent response, 10 with bilateral increases in latency, and 6 with normal responses. There was no correlation between normal visual evoked potentials and a good visual outcome. Only 2 of 6 children with normal responses had normal vision. Abnormal or absent responses are more predictive of a poor recovery of vision because only 3 of 21 (14%) had normal vision on subsequent examination. Abnormal electroencephalographic findings with focal or multifocal spike-and-wave discharges or cerebral atrophy on cranial computed tomography are also poor prognostic signs.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143496
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.866
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.819
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, VCNen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-12T03:51:10Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-12T03:51:10Z-
dc.date.issued1991en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPediatric Neurology, 1991, v. 7 n. 3, p. 178-185en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0887-8994en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143496-
dc.description.abstractThirty-four children (20 boys, 14 girls) with congenital and acquired cortical blindness were analyzed for visual outcome in relation to etiology, visual evoked potentials, electroencephalography, and cranial computed tomography. All 7 children with congenital cortical blindness remained blind on subsequent examination. Of the 27 children with acquired blindness, 16 (59%) had poor visual outcome. Poor visual outcome occurred in those with cardiac arrest, hypoxia, status epilepticus, intracranial hemorrhage, cerebral thrombosis, and head trauma. Good visual outcome occurred in children with hypotensive episodes after cardiac surgery. Of the 12 children with recovery of vision, the interval from acute loss of vision to partial or total recovery was 2 weeks to 5 months. Seven children had complete recovery of vision with no residual visual field defect. The majority of children (87%) had focal or multifocal spike-and-waves and slow sharp-wave discharges on electroencephalography. None had photic recruitment response or occipital spike-and-wave discharges. Flash visual evoked potential studies performed during acute episodes of cortical blindness documented 11 with absent response, 10 with bilateral increases in latency, and 6 with normal responses. There was no correlation between normal visual evoked potentials and a good visual outcome. Only 2 of 6 children with normal responses had normal vision. Abnormal or absent responses are more predictive of a poor recovery of vision because only 3 of 21 (14%) had normal vision on subsequent examination. Abnormal electroencephalographic findings with focal or multifocal spike-and-wave discharges or cerebral atrophy on cranial computed tomography are also poor prognostic signs.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/pedneuen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPediatric Neurologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshBlindness/congenital/*etiology/physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain Damage, Chronic/complications/physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.mesh*Electroencephalographyen_US
dc.subject.meshEvoked Potentials, Visual/*physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfanten_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshReaction Time/physiologyen_US
dc.subject.mesh*Tomography, X-Ray Computeden_US
dc.subject.meshVisual Cortex/*physiopathologyen_US
dc.titleCortical blindness in children: A study of etiology and prognosisen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, VCN:vcnwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, VCN=rp00334en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0887-8994(91)90081-Uen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid1878097-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0025816762en_HK
dc.identifier.volume7en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage178en_HK
dc.identifier.epage185en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1991FU22400004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, VCN=7202525632en_HK

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